Tag Archives: M.A. Tuinman

Self- and other-efficacy are related to current smoking during a quit attempt: a daily diary study in single-smoking couples






CONCLUSION: To start the quit attempt with high self-efficacy, and maintain it throughout the quit attempt seems important for successful abstinence, as this might help to overcome a lapse. This is the first study to show that other-efficacy is related to smoking behaviour. However, more research is needed regarding the temporal order of smoking and efficacy, from both smokers and spouses. Continue reading

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Smoking Cessation Experience in Indonesia: Does the Non-smoking Wife Play a Role?






CONCLUSION: Indonesian ex-smokers often had multiple reasons for quitting smoking. The process was typically difficult and kept private. While wives had little influence on the cessation process, they provided support and could institute a smoking ban in the house. Continue reading

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Attitudes and Perceptions of Parenthood Among Young Adult Survivors of Childhood Cancer






Purpose: Increasing numbers of childhood cancer survivors enter adulthood and encounter decisions surrounding parenthood. However, limited research has systematically examined how childhood cancer may influence parenthood attitudes among survivors. Methods: Adult survivors of childhood cancer, who had or wanted to have children (N = 77; M(age) = 30.2 years, range: 22-43; 91% White), rated their perceived impact of cancer at enrollment and parenthood attitudes using the “Attitudes to Parenthood… Continue reading

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Attitudes and Perceptions of Parenthood Among Young Adult Survivors of Childhood Cancer






Purpose: Increasing numbers of childhood cancer survivors enter adulthood and encounter decisions surrounding parenthood. However, limited research has systematically examined how childhood cancer may influence parenthood attitudes among survivors. Methods: Adult survivors of childhood cancer, who had or wanted to have children (N = 77; M(age) = 30.2 years, range: 22-43; 91% White), rated their perceived impact of cancer at enrollment and parenthood attitudes using the “Attitudes to Parenthood… Continue reading

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Daily support and negative control during a quit attempt in single-smoking couples






CONCLUSIONS: Support seems important during a quit attempt as it was related to a lower probability of smoking and higher relationship satisfaction in couples, while negative control behaviors should be avoided as they were associated with higher probability of smoking and lower relationship satisfaction. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2021 APA, all rights reserved). Continue reading

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A planning intervention to quit smoking in single-smoking couples: does partner involvement improve effectiveness?






CONCLUSION: The involvement of a non-smoking partner in the planning did not increase its effectiveness. However, couple participation and daily measurements during a quit attempt could be important components of future interventions. Continue reading

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Effects on patient-reported outcomes of “Screening of Distress and Referral Need” implemented in Dutch oncology practice






CONCLUSIONS: After implementation of SDRN, patients report significantly fewer psychosocial (practical, social, and emotional) problems on the DT/PL but responses on the other patient-reported outcomes were comparable. These results add to the mixed evidence on the beneficial effect of distress screening. More and better focused research is needed. Continue reading

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Effects on patient-reported outcomes of “Screening of Distress and Referral Need” implemented in Dutch oncology practice






CONCLUSIONS: After implementation of SDRN, patients report significantly fewer psychosocial (practical, social, and emotional) problems on the DT/PL but responses on the other patient-reported outcomes were comparable. These results add to the mixed evidence on the beneficial effect of distress screening. More and better focused research is needed. Continue reading

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Couples’ catastrophizing and co-rumination: Dyadic diary study of patient fatigue after cancer






CONCLUSIONS: Spouse catastrophizing contributes to patient fatigue severity through couples’ ruminative communications. Co-rumination was not related to relationship satisfaction. Reducing patient and spouse catastrophizing and fostering adaptive dyadic communication in daily life could be targets for future interventions aiming to relieve fatigue in patients after completion of cancer treatment. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2019 APA, all rights reserved). Continue reading

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A dyadic planning intervention to quit smoking in single-smoking couples: design of a randomized controlled trial






BACKGROUND: Tobacco use is the largest preventable cause of death. Smoking cessation interventions that use implementation intentions show promising results. Implementation intentions are if-then plans that specify a certain behaviour within a situational context. This study will examine whether involving a non-smoking partner could improve planning interventions, and whether and which partner interactions underlie this effectiveness. Continue reading

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