Category Archives: Psychooncology

Exploring the contribution of psychosocial factors to fatigue in patients with advanced incurable cancer.






Exploring the contribution of psychosocial factors to fatigue in patients with advanced incurable cancer.

Psychooncology. 2014 Jan 24;

Authors: Peters ME, Goedendorp MM, Verhagen SA, van der Graaf WT, Bleijenberg G

Abstract
OBJECTIVE: Fatigue is the most frequently occurring and distressing symptom in patients with advanced cancer, caused by multiple factors. Neither a specific histological diagnosis of malignancy nor the type of anticancer treatment seem to be strongly related to fatigue, which support the idea that other factors may play a role. This study investigated to what extent the model of fatigue-perpetuating factors that is known for cancer survivors was applicable for patients with advanced cancer.
METHODS: Patients on active treatment for various incurable cancers were asked to complete the Checklist Individual Strength, subscale fatigue severity and physical activity, the Acceptance scale of the Illness Cognition Questionnaire, the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, the Fatigue Catastrophizing Scale, the Symptom Checklist subscale sleep, and the van Sonderen Social Support List-Discrepancies.
RESULTS: The questionnaires were filled in by 137 patients. Inappropriate coping, fear of progression, fatigue catastrophizing, discrepancies in social support, depressive mood, self reported physical activity, and sleeping problems were all related to fatigue severity in univariate analyses, of which the latter two were significant in a multivariate linear regression analysis.
CONCLUSION: This study tested fatigue-perpetuating factors known to be of relevance in cancer survivors, for their relation with fatigue severity in palliative patients. We demonstrated that these factors were also relevant for patients on palliative treatment. On the basis of our results, we suggest clinicians confronted with palliative patients with serious fatigue to address sleeping problems and promote physical activity. In case of persistent fatigue, personalized cognitive behavioral therapy can be considered. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

PMID: 24458595 [PubMed – as supplied by publisher]

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A prospective study on educational level and adaptation to cancer, within one year after the diagnosis, in an older population.






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A prospective study on educational level and adaptation to cancer, within one year after the diagnosis, in an older population.
Psychooncology. 2008 Apr;17(4):373-82
Authors: Barbareschi G, Sanderman R, Tuinst… Continue reading

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Sexual function, depressive symptoms and marital status in nonseminoma testicular cancer patients: a longitudinal study.






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Sexual function, depressive symptoms and marital status in nonseminoma testicular cancer patients: a longitudinal study.
Psychooncology. 2010 Mar;19(3):238-47
Authors: Tuinman MA, Hoekstra HJ, Vidrine DJ, Grit… Continue reading

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The role of distress, neuroticism and time since diagnosis in explaining support behaviors in partners of women with breast cancer: results of a longitudinal analysis.






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The role of distress, neuroticism and time since diagnosis in explaining support behaviors in partners of women with breast cancer: results of a longitudinal analysis.
Psychooncology. 2007 Oct;16(10):913-9
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The concept and measurement of meaning in life in Dutch cancer patients.






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The concept and measurement of meaning in life in Dutch cancer patients.
Psychooncology. 2007 Mar;16(3):241-8
Authors: Jaarsma TA, Pool G, Ranchor AV, Sanderman R
Abstract
We investigated the p… Continue reading

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Personal control after a breast cancer diagnosis: stability and adaptive value.






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Personal control after a breast cancer diagnosis: stability and adaptive value.
Psychooncology. 2009 Jan;18(1):104-8
Authors: Henselmans I, Sanderman R, Baas PC, Smink A, Ranchor AV
Abstract
OB… Continue reading

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Type of social support matters for prediction of posttraumatic growth among cancer survivors.






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Type of social support matters for prediction of posttraumatic growth among cancer survivors.
Psychooncology. 2010 Jan;19(1):46-53
Authors: Schroevers MJ, Helgeson VS, Sanderman R, Ranchor AV
Abstract
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Personal control over the cure of breast cancer: adaptiveness, underlying beliefs and correlates.






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Personal control over the cure of breast cancer: adaptiveness, underlying beliefs and correlates.
Psychooncology. 2010 May;19(5):525-34
Authors: Henselmans I, Sanderman R, Helgeson VS, de Vries J, Smink A, Ran… Continue reading

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Does screening for distress efficiently uncover meetable unmet needs in cancer patients?






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Does screening for distress efficiently uncover meetable unmet needs in cancer patients?

Psychooncology. 2011 Jun;20(6):655-63

Authors: van Scheppingen C, Schroevers MJ, Smink A, van der Linden YM, Mul VE, Langendijk JA, Coyne JC, Sanderman R

Abstract
OBJECTIVES: We evaluated screening for distress in terms of its ability to uncover unmet need for psychosocial services in cancer patients. Correlates of distress, need for services and met and unmet need for services were investigated.
METHODS: Immediately after cancer treatment (T1) and 2 months later (T2), 302 patients completed the Hopkins Symptom Checklist-25 (HSCL-25) and a single question assessing the need for services. All distressed patients (HSCL-25≥39) and non-distressed patients endorsing a need for services were then called (n = 99) to assess their need.
RESULTS: Thirty-seven percent (T1) and 31% (T2) of patients were distressed and 31% (T1) and 18% (T2) expressed the need for services. Both time points showed higher distress in younger patients and females and lower distress in prostate cancer and patients treated by radiotherapy only. Less need for services was found in prostate cancer (T1), greater need was related to being single (T1) and younger (T2). Distress and need for services were positively related (p<0.001). The HSCL-25 showed modest sensitivity (T1: 0.59, T2: 0.65) and specificity (T1: 0.75, T2: 0.78) as an indicator of need for services. Interviews at T2 revealed that 51% of distressed patients needed no psychosocial services and 25% were already receiving services. At T2, regardless of distress level, 10% of all screened patients reported an unmet need for psychosocial services.
CONCLUSIONS: Depending on the clinical context, screening might be more efficient if it assessed the unmet need for services rather than distress. More attention should be concentrated on directing patients with meetable unmet needs to available services.

PMID: 21381148 [PubMed – indexed for MEDLINE]

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Couples dealing with cancer: role and gender differences regarding psychological distress and quality of life.






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Couples dealing with cancer: role and gender differences regarding psychological distress and quality of life.
Psychooncology. 2000 May-Jun;9(3):232-42
Authors: Hagedoorn M, Buunk BP, Kuijer RG, Wobbes T, Sand… Continue reading

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