Tag Archives: R. Sanderman

The role of pain behaviour and family caregiver responses in the link between pain catastrophising and pain intensity: A moderated mediation model.






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The role of pain behaviour and family caregiver responses in the link between pain catastrophising and pain intensity: A moderated mediation model.

Psychol Health. 2017 Apr;32(4):422-438

Authors: Mohammadi S, Dehghani M, Sanderman R, Hagedoorn M

Abstract
OBJECTIVES: This study investigated the mediating role of pain behaviours in the association between pain catastrophising and pain intensity and explored the moderating role of family caregivers’ responses to pain in the link between pain behaviours and pain intensity.
METHODS: The sample consisted of 154 chronic pain patients and their family caregivers. Patients completed questionnaires regarding pain intensity, pain catastrophising, pain behaviours and their caregivers’ responses to their pain. Family caregivers reported their responses to the patients’ pain.
RESULTS: Pain catastrophising was associated with pain intensity (r = 0.37) and pain behaviours partly mediated this association. The positive association between pain behaviours and pain intensity was significant only if patients reported that their family caregivers showed high levels of solicitous (effect = .49) and distracting responses (effect = .58), and if caregivers reported to show high levels of solicitous responses (effect = .51). No support was found for negative responses as a moderator neither based on patients’ perception of negative responses nor based on caregivers’ perception of negative responses.
CONCLUSIONS: The findings are in line with the idea that family caregivers’ solicitous and distracting responses convey to patients that their condition is serious, which may reinforce patients’ pain and pain behaviours, especially in those who catastrophise.

PMID: 28042705 [PubMed – in process]

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Sustaining program effectiveness after implementation: The case of the self-management of well-being group intervention for older adults.






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Sustaining program effectiveness after implementation: The case of the self-management of well-being group intervention for older adults.

Patient Educ Couns. 2017 Jun;100(6):1177-1184

Authors: Goedendorp MM, Kuiper D, Reijneveld SA, Sanderman R, Steverink N

Abstract
OBJECTIVE: The Self-Management of Well-being (SMW) group intervention for older women was implemented in health and social care. Our aim was to assess whether effects of the SMW intervention were comparable with the original randomized controlled trial (RCT). Furthermore, we investigated threats to effectiveness, such as participant adherence, group reached, and program fidelity.
METHODS: In the implementation study (IMP) 287 and RCT 142 women participated. We compared scores on self-management ability and well-being of the IMP and RCT. For adherence, drop-out rates and session attendance were compared. Regarding reach, we compared participants’ baseline characteristics. Professionals completed questions regarding program fidelity.
RESULTS: No significant differences were found on effect outcomes and adherence between IMP and RCT (all p≥0.135). Intervention effect sizes were equal (0.47-0.59). IMP participants were significantly less lonely and more likely to be married, but had lower well-being. Most professionals followed the protocol, with only minimal deviations.
CONCLUSION: The effectiveness of the SMW group intervention was reproduced after implementation, with similar participant adherence, minimal changes in the group reached, and high program fidelity.
PRACTICE IMPLICATIONS: The SMW group intervention can be transferred to health and social care without loss of effectiveness. Implementation at a larger scale is warranted.

PMID: 28089311 [PubMed – in process]

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Mindfulness and Self-compassion as Unique and Common Predictors of Affect in the General Population.






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Mindfulness and Self-compassion as Unique and Common Predictors of Affect in the General Population.

Mindfulness (N Y). 2016;7(6):1289-1296

Authors: López A, Sanderman R, Schroevers MJ

Abstract
In contrast to the increased research interest in the benefits of mindfulness and self-compassion, relatively few studies have examined their unique and combined effects in predicting affect. This cross-sectional study examined the predictive value of mindfulness and self-compassion for depressive symptoms, negative affect, and positive affect in a large representative sample of community adults (N = 1736). The Five Facets of Mindfulness Questionnaire (FFMQ) was used as a measure of mindfulness and the Self-Compassion Scale (SCS) as a measure of self-compassion. Five FFMQ facets were explored: observe, describe, act with awareness, non-judgment, and non-reactivity. Two SCS facets were explored: its positive items (SCS Pos) and its negative items (SCS Neg). When simultaneously examining all seven facets of mindfulness and self-compassion, three of the five FFMQ facets and SCS Neg significantly predicted both depressive symptoms and negative affect, with SCS Neg and act with awareness being the strongest predictors. These findings suggest that a harsh attitude towards oneself and a lack of attention when acting have the greatest value in predicting the presence of psychological symptoms. With respect to positive affect, four of the five FFMQ facets (except non-judgment) were significant predictors, with no unique predictive value of the two SCS’s facets, suggesting that mindfulness is a more important predictor of positive affect than self-compassion, as measured by the FFMQ and SCS.

PMID: 27909464 [PubMed – in process]

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Marijuana Use and Dependence in Chilean Adolescents and Its Association with Family and Peer Marijuana Use.






Marijuana Use and Dependence in Chilean Adolescents and Its Association with Family and Peer Marijuana Use.

Int J Behav Med. 2016 Oct 3;:

Authors: Lobato M, Sanderman R, Pizarro E, Hagedoorn M

Abstract
PURPOSE: The purpose of the study is to examine (1) whether family and peer marijuana use are independently related to adolescent marijuana use in Chile, (2) whether family and peer marijuana use are associated with adolescent marijuana dependence in adolescents using marijuana, and (3) whether the adolescent’s age moderates the association between family or peer use and adolescent marijuana use and/or dependence.
METHOD: This study used data from the National Survey on Drug Use in the General Population in Chile (a cross-sectional observational study), which was conducted in 2008 and 2010 in 4413 adolescents aged 12-19. Adolescents answered questions about their past-year marijuana use and dependence (ICD-10 criteria) and the marijuana use of their family and peers. Logistic regressions were performed while controlling for confounders.
RESULTS: Adolescents who had a family member who used marijuana were five times more likely to use the drug. Adolescents with a close friend who used marijuana were eight times more likely to use marijuana. When adolescents were using marijuana, they were three times more likely to be dependent if they had a family member who used the drug. However, no significant relationship was found between peer use and dependence. No statistically significant interactions were found between family or peer use and age.
CONCLUSION: Family and peer marijuana use was independently associated with adolescent’s past-year marijuana use; however, only family marijuana use was statistically associated with adolescent’s marijuana dependence.

PMID: 27699626 [PubMed – as supplied by publisher]

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Impaired Mood in Headache Clinic Patients: Associations With the Perceived Hindrance and Attainability of Personal Goals.






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Impaired Mood in Headache Clinic Patients: Associations With the Perceived Hindrance and Attainability of Personal Goals.

Headache. 2016 May 20;

Authors: Ciere Y, Visser A, Lebbink J, Sanderman R, Fleer J

Abstract
BACKGROUND: Headache disorders are often accompanied by impaired mood, especially in the headache clinic population. There is a large body of literature demonstrating that an illness or disability may affect the way in which patients perceive their personal goals and that the perception that the attainability of goals is hindered by the illness is a risk factor for impaired mood. However, empirical evidence regarding the extent to which goals are hindered or less attainable as a result of a headache disorder, and how that is related to mood, is currently lacking.
OBJECTIVE: The aim of this cross-sectional study was to examine associations between headache severity, goal hindrance and attainability, and mood in a headache clinic population.
METHODS: The sample consisted of 65 adult patients seeking treatment at a tertiary headache clinic. Prior to their first appointment in the clinic, patients completed self-report measures of headache severity, goals and mood (PANAS).
RESULTS: Higher self-reported headache intensity was associated with higher goal hindrance (r = .38, P = .004), whereas greater headache frequency was associated with lower goal attainability (r = .30, P = .022). Higher perceived goal hindrance was associated with lower positive mood (r = -.27, P = .032) and higher negative mood (r = .28, P = .027). Furthermore, lower perceived goal attainability was associated with higher negative mood (r = -.34, P = .007). Goal perceptions explained an additional 11.4% of the variance in positive mood (F = 3.250, P = .047 <.05) and 10.5% of the variance in negative mood (F = 3.459, P = .039) beyond the effect of age and headache severity.
CONCLUSION: The results of this preliminary study suggest that perceptions of increased goal hindrance and decreased goal attainability may indeed be a risk factor for impaired mood in the headache clinic population and highlight the need for further, longitudinal research. Obtaining more insight into goal processes (eg, what types of goals are specifically disturbed, which goal adjustment strategies are (mal)adaptive) may help to identify ways to improve outcomes in the headache clinic population.

PMID: 27197699 [PubMed – as supplied by publisher]

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Malnutrition is associated with worse health-related quality of life in children with cancer.






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Malnutrition is associated with worse health-related quality of life in children with cancer.

Support Care Cancer. 2015 Oct;23(10):3043-52

Authors: Brinksma A, Sanderman R, Roodbol PF, Sulkers E, Burgerhof JG, de Bont ES, Tissing WJ

Abstract
PURPOSE: Malnutrition in childhood cancer patients has been associated with lower health-related quality of life (HRQOL). However, this association has never actually been tested. Therefore, we aimed to determine the association between nutritional status and HRQOL in children with cancer.
METHODS: In 104 children, aged 2-18 years and diagnosed with hematological, solid, or brain malignancies, nutritional status and HRQOL were assessed at diagnosis and at 3, 6, and 12 months using the child- and parent-report versions of the PedsQL 4.0 Generic scale and the PedsQL 3.0 Cancer Module. Scores on both scales range from 0 to 100.
RESULTS: Undernourished children (body mass index (BMI) or fat-free mass < -2 standard deviation score (SDS)) reported significantly lower PedsQL scores compared with well-nourished children on the domains physical functioning (-13.3), social functioning (-7.0), cancer summary scale (-5.9), and nausea (-14.7). Overnourished children (BMI or fat mass >2 SDS) reported lower scores on emotional (-8.0) and cognitive functioning (-9.2) and on the cancer summary scale (-6.6), whereas parent-report scores were lower on social functioning (-7.5). Weight loss (>0.5 SDS) was associated with lower scores on physical functioning (-13.9 child-report and -10.7 parent-report), emotional (-7.4) and social functioning (-6.0) (child-report), pain (-11.6), and nausea (-7.8) (parent-report). Parents reported worse social functioning and more pain in children with weight gain (>0.5 SDS) compared with children with stable weight status.
CONCLUSIONS: Undernutrition and weight loss were associated with worse physical and social functioning, whereas overnutrition and weight gain affected the emotional and social domains of HRQL. Interventions that improve nutritional status may contribute to enhanced health outcomes in children with cancer.

PMID: 25752883 [PubMed – indexed for MEDLINE]

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Identifying the determinants of use of the G&G interventions for older adults in health and social care: protocol of a multilevel approach.






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Identifying the determinants of use of the G&G interventions for older adults in health and social care: protocol of a multilevel approach.
BMC Res Notes. 2015;8:296
Authors: Kuiper D, Goedendor… Continue reading

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Antibiotic information application offers nurses quick support.






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Antibiotic information application offers nurses quick support.

Am J Infect Control. 2016 Feb 19;

Authors: Wentzel J, van Drie-Pierik R, Nijdam L, Geesing J, Sanderman R, van Gemert-Pijnen JE

Abstract
BACKGROUND: Nurses can be crucial contributors to antibiotic stewardship programs (ASPs), interventions aimed at improving antibiotic use, but nurse empowerment in ASPs adds to their job complexity. Nurses work in complex settings with high cognitive loads, which ask for easily accessible information. An information application (app) was developed to support nurses in ASPs. The efficiency, effectiveness, and user satisfaction regarding this antibiotic app were tested in a pilot study.
METHODS: The app was introduced into 2 lung wards of a local teaching hospital. During the 8-month pilot study, the 62 nurses of the wards had access to the app. Changes in user satisfaction regarding information support, safety attitudes, and ASP behavior were assessed with a questionnaire. At baseline, 28 nurses completed the (e-mail) questionnaire; after the study, 18 nurses participated. Scenario-based tests were done to assess app efficiency and effectiveness at baseline (n = 16) and in a randomized control (without the app, n = 17) and intervention condition (with the app, n = 17).
RESULTS: Significant improvements were found regarding task support (P = .041), reliability (P = .004), unobtrusiveness (P = .000), relevance (P = .002), user friendliness (P = .000), speed, and hyperlinks (P = .001). An improvement in communication was observed regarding nurse-physician understanding (P = .034). With the app, nurses solved the scenarios faster than without it.
CONCLUSIONS: The human-centered design approach and persuasive strategy of task support were effective in reducing time needed to find information. Stewardship-related behaviors need active education strategies.

PMID: 26905792 [PubMed – as supplied by publisher]

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Patient satisfaction with a teleradiology service in general practice.






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Patient satisfaction with a teleradiology service in general practice.

BMC Fam Pract. 2016;17(1):17

Authors: Jacobs JJ, Ekkelboom R, Jacobs JP, van der Molen T, Sanderman R

Abstract
BACKGROUND: Accessibility to secondary health services is not always easy for patients who live at a great distance of hospital. In these circumstances, transferring diagnostic tools and treatment options to primary care could prove beneficial for patients. To do so, the quality of medical care and the costs and benefits of the approach need to be assessed. However, the patient perspective is equally important, offering important insights.
METHODS: In a cross-sectional study we investigate the satisfaction of patients toward a new teleradiology facility offered a general practice on Ameland, an island in the Netherlands. A questionnaire was created based on the Dutch version of the Patient Satisfaction Questionnaire III and completed by all patients after receiving an x-ray in primary care between June 1, 2007 and June 1, 2009. Those who received more than one x-ray in that period were included only once. The technical and interpersonal skills of doctors were rated out the sum score of the questionnaire namely 25 and 30, respectively. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used to analyze the differences between the means of the satisfaction subscales and the patient characteristics.
RESULTS: The response proportion was after reminder 65 % (381/587 patients). Satisfaction with the technical skills of the doctor providing the teleradiology service was 22.4 ± 3.7, while satisfaction with the interpersonal skills of the doctor during the diagnostic phase was 26.8 ± 3.8. Island residents, the elderly, and those with no history of trauma were more satisfied with the technical and interpersonal aspects of the consultation than non-residents, younger patients, and those with a history of trauma.
CONCLUSION: Patients in the island community of Ameland experienced high levels of satisfaction with the teleradiology service offered in primary care.

PMID: 26864118 [PubMed – in process]

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Fracture diagnostics, unnecessary travel and treatment: a comparative study before and after the introduction of teleradiology in a remote general practice.






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Fracture diagnostics, unnecessary travel and treatment: a comparative study before and after the introduction of teleradiology in a remote general practice.
BMC Fam Pract. 2015;16:53
Authors: Jacobs… Continue reading

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