Tag Archives: M.M. Goedendorp

A randomized controlled trial of web-based cognitive behavioral therapy for severely fatigued breast cancer survivors (CHANGE-study): study protocol.






A randomized controlled trial of web-based cognitive behavioral therapy for severely fatigued breast cancer survivors (CHANGE-study): study protocol.

BMC Cancer. 2015;15(1):765

Authors: Abrahams HJ, Gielissen MF, Goedendorp MM, Berends T, Peters ME, Poort H, Verhagen CA, Knoop H

Abstract
BACKGROUND: About one third of breast cancer survivors suffer from persistent severe fatigue after completion of curative cancer treatment. Face-to-face cognitive behavioral therapy (F2F CBT), especially designed for fatigue in cancer survivors, was found effective in reducing fatigue. However, this intervention is intensive and treatment capacity is limited. To extend treatment options, a web-based version of CBT requiring less therapist time was developed. This intervention is aimed at changing fatigue-perpetuating cognitions and behaviors. The efficacy of web-based CBT will be examined in a multicenter randomized controlled trial.
METHODS: In total, 132 severely fatigued breast cancer survivors will be recruited and randomized to either an intervention condition or care as usual (ratio 1:1). Participants will be assessed at baseline and 6 months thereafter. The intervention group will receive web-based CBT, consisting of three F2F sessions and maximally eight web-based modules over a period of 6 months. The care as usual group will be on a waiting list for regular F2F CBT. The total duration of the waiting list is 6 months. The primary outcome of the study is fatigue severity. Secondary outcomes are functional impairments, psychological distress and quality of life.
DISCUSSION: If web-based CBT is effective, it will provide an additional treatment option for fatigue in breast cancer survivors. Web-based CBT is expected to be less time-consuming for therapists than regular F2F CBT, which would result in an increased treatment capacity. Moreover, the intervention would become more easily accessible for a larger number of patients, and patients can save travel time and costs.
TRIAL REGISTRATION: Dutch Trial Registry – NTR4309.

PMID: 26500019 [PubMed – as supplied by publisher]

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Fatigue and its associated psychosocial factors in cancer patients on active palliative treatment measured over time.






Fatigue and its associated psychosocial factors in cancer patients on active palliative treatment measured over time.

Support Care Cancer. 2015 Sep 3;

Authors: Peters ME, Goedendorp MM, Verhagen CA, Bleijenberg G, van der Graaf WT

Abstract
PURPOSE: Fatigue is a frequently reported symptom by patients with advanced cancer, but hardly any prospective information is available about fatigue while on treatment in the palliative setting. In a previous cross-sectional study, we found several factors contributing to fatigue in these patients. In this study, we investigated the course of fatigue over time and if psychosocial factors were associated with fatigue over time.
METHODS: Patients on cancer treatment for incurable solid tumors were observed over 6 months. Patients filled in the Checklist Individual Strength monthly to measure the course of fatigue. Baseline questionnaires were used to measure disease acceptance, anxiety, depressive mood, fatigue catastrophizing, sleeping problems, discrepancies in social support, and self-reported physical activity for their relation with fatigue over time.
RESULTS: At baseline 137 patients and after 6 months 89 patients participated. The mean duration of participation was 4.9 months. At most time points, fatigue scores were significantly higher in the group dropouts in comparison with the group participating 6 months (completers). Overall fatigue levels remained stable over time for the majority of participants. In the completers, 42 % never experienced severe fatigue, 29 % persisted being severely fatigued, and others had either an increasing or decreasing level. Of the investigated factors, low reported physical activity and non-acceptance of cancer were associated significantly to fatigue.
CONCLUSION: A substantial number of participants never experienced severe fatigue and fatigue levels remained stable over time. For those who do experience severe fatigue, non-acceptance of having incurable cancer and low self-reported physical activity may be fatigue-perpetuating factors.

PMID: 26335403 [PubMed – as supplied by publisher]

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Fatigue screening in breast cancer patients: identifying likely cases of cancer-related fatigue.






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Fatigue screening in breast cancer patients: identifying likely cases of cancer-related fatigue.

Psychooncology. 2015 Jul 22;

Authors: Goedendorp MM, Jacobsen PB, Andrykowski MA

Abstract
OBJECTIVE: For clinical and research purposes, efficient identification of cases of cancer-related fatigue (CRF) is important, as CRF can be persistent and interfere with usual functioning. While various fatigue-screening instruments are available, no brief screening indices have been developed using formally diagnosed CRF cases as the criterion.
METHODS: Breast cancer patients (n = 385) completed a fatigue diagnostic interview and self-report fatigue measures (Profile of Mood States-fatigue subscale, Fatigue Symptom Inventory, and SF-36 vitality subscale), after initial adjuvant therapy (post-treatment (post-Tx) 1 assessment), after completion of radiotherapy for women receiving chemotherapy + radiotherapy (post-Tx 2 assessment), and 6 months after completion of all adjuvant therapy (6-month post-Tx assessment). CRF cases were identified using specific diagnostic criteria. ROC analyses identified screening indices, which could accurately identify CRF cases after initial adjuvant therapy. Screening indices were cross-validated using post-Tx 2 and 6-month follow-up assessment data.
RESULTS: A total of 104 women (27%) met CRF criteria after initial adjuvant therapy. Six two-item screening indices were identified. For all indices, area under the curve exceeded 0.80, sensitivity exceeded 0.80, and specificity exceeded 0.57. Cross-validation suggested that, except for the index based on SF-36, all the indices continued to accurately identify CRF cases at the post-Tx 2 and 6-month post-Tx assessments. Overall, a two-item composite index based on Fatigue Symptom Inventory ‘most severity’ and ‘work interference’ items performed best.
CONCLUSIONS: Breast cancer patients and survivors meeting CRF diagnostic criteria can be accurately identified using brief screening indices derived from common self-report fatigue measures. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

PMID: 26202003 [PubMed – as supplied by publisher]

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A web-based cognitive behaviour therapy for chronic fatigue in type 1 diabetes (Dia-Fit): study protocol for a randomised controlled trial.






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A web-based cognitive behaviour therapy for chronic fatigue in type 1 diabetes (Dia-Fit): study protocol for a randomised controlled trial.
Trials. 2015 Jun 6;16(1):262
Authors: Menting J, Nikolaus S,… Continue reading

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A web-based cognitive behaviour therapy for chronic fatigue in type 1 diabetes (Dia-Fit): study protocol for a randomised controlled trial.






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A web-based cognitive behaviour therapy for chronic fatigue in type 1 diabetes (Dia-Fit): study protocol for a randomised controlled trial.
Trials. 2015 Jun 6;16(1):262
Authors: Menting J, Nikolaus S,… Continue reading

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A prospective analysis on fatigue and experienced burden in informal caregivers of cancer patients during cancer treatment in the palliative phase.






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A prospective analysis on fatigue and experienced burden in informal caregivers of cancer patients during cancer treatment in the palliative phase.

Acta Oncol. 2014 Oct 7;:1-7

Authors: Peters ME, Goedendorp MM, Verhagen SA, Smilde TJ, Bleijenberg G, van der Graaf WT

Abstract
Background. Although fatigue is the most frequently occurring symptom in patients with cancer, hardly anything is known about fatigue of their informal caregivers and the impact fatigue might have on perceived burden with providing care. We investigated the presence of fatigue in caregivers, its course and the relation of fatigue severity between caregivers and patients. Furthermore, we explored in caregivers whether fatigue severity was correlated to experienced burden. Material and methods. Informal caregivers and patients on cancer treatment in the palliative phase completed questionnaires at baseline and follow-up (6 months later). To measure fatigue severity, both groups completed the Checklist Individual Strength. Additionally, caregivers completed the Caregivers Strain Index to assess experienced burden with providing care. Descriptive analyses, paired t-tests, χ(2)-tests, Pearson’s correlations and regression analysis were performed. Results. At baseline 111 couples (patients and caregivers) participated, at follow-up 75 couples. At both time points 23% of caregivers were severely fatigued. There was no significant correlation between patients and caregivers on fatigue. Higher fatigue in both patients and caregivers was correlated with higher burden in caregivers and over 30% of burden could be explained by fatigue. Conclusion. Almost a quarter of caregivers of patients on active palliative treatment were severely fatigued, which figure remained stable over time. Fatigue in both patients and caregivers was related to caregivers’ burden. This observation should be taken into account with the growing demand on caregivers and the increase in cancer treatment options in the palliative setting.

PMID: 25291079 [PubMed – as supplied by publisher]

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Response to ‘Underperformance of Myalgic Encephalomyelitis (ME)/Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS) patients at neurocognitive tests should be assessed objectively’.






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Response to ‘Underperformance of Myalgic Encephalomyelitis (ME)/Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS) patients at neurocognitive tests should be assessed objectively’.
J Psychosom Res. 2014 Apr;76(4):340
Authors: Goed… Continue reading

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Exploring the contribution of psychosocial factors to fatigue in patients with advanced incurable cancer.






Exploring the contribution of psychosocial factors to fatigue in patients with advanced incurable cancer.

Psychooncology. 2014 Jan 24;

Authors: Peters ME, Goedendorp MM, Verhagen SA, van der Graaf WT, Bleijenberg G

Abstract
OBJECTIVE: Fatigue is the most frequently occurring and distressing symptom in patients with advanced cancer, caused by multiple factors. Neither a specific histological diagnosis of malignancy nor the type of anticancer treatment seem to be strongly related to fatigue, which support the idea that other factors may play a role. This study investigated to what extent the model of fatigue-perpetuating factors that is known for cancer survivors was applicable for patients with advanced cancer.
METHODS: Patients on active treatment for various incurable cancers were asked to complete the Checklist Individual Strength, subscale fatigue severity and physical activity, the Acceptance scale of the Illness Cognition Questionnaire, the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, the Fatigue Catastrophizing Scale, the Symptom Checklist subscale sleep, and the van Sonderen Social Support List-Discrepancies.
RESULTS: The questionnaires were filled in by 137 patients. Inappropriate coping, fear of progression, fatigue catastrophizing, discrepancies in social support, depressive mood, self reported physical activity, and sleeping problems were all related to fatigue severity in univariate analyses, of which the latter two were significant in a multivariate linear regression analysis.
CONCLUSION: This study tested fatigue-perpetuating factors known to be of relevance in cancer survivors, for their relation with fatigue severity in palliative patients. We demonstrated that these factors were also relevant for patients on palliative treatment. On the basis of our results, we suggest clinicians confronted with palliative patients with serious fatigue to address sleeping problems and promote physical activity. In case of persistent fatigue, personalized cognitive behavioral therapy can be considered. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

PMID: 24458595 [PubMed – as supplied by publisher]

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Development of fatigue in cancer survivors: a prospective follow-up study from diagnosis into the year after treatment.






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Development of fatigue in cancer survivors: a prospective follow-up study from diagnosis into the year after treatment.
J Pain Symptom Manage. 2013 Feb;45(2):213-22
Authors: Goedendorp MM, Gielissen MF, Verhag… Continue reading

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Severe Fatigue During the Palliative Treatment Phase of Cancer: An Exploratory Study.






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Severe Fatigue During the Palliative Treatment Phase of Cancer: An Exploratory Study.
Cancer Nurs. 2013 Apr 25;
Authors: Peters ME, Goedendorp MM, Verhagen CA, van der Graaf WT, Bleijenberg G
Abstract
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