Tag Archives: M.J. Schroevers

The Therapeutic Alliance Predicts Outcomes of Cognitive Behavior Therapy but Not of Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy for Depressive Symptoms.






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The Therapeutic Alliance Predicts Outcomes of Cognitive Behavior Therapy but Not of Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy for Depressive Symptoms.
Psychother Psychosom. 2015;84(5):314-5
Authors: Snippe… Continue reading

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Mindfulness-based cognitive therapy for seasonal affective disorder: a pilot study.






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Mindfulness-based cognitive therapy for seasonal affective disorder: a pilot study.

J Affect Disord. 2014 Oct;168:205-9

Authors: Fleer J, Schroevers M, Panjer V, Geerts E, Meesters Y

Abstract
BACKGROUND: The best available treatment for seasonal affective disorder (SAD) is light therapy. Yet, this treatment does not prevent recurrence of depression in subsequent seasons. The aim of the study is to gain preliminary insight in the efficacy of Mindfulness Based Cognitive Therapy (MBCT) in the prevention of SAD recurrence.
METHODS: This is a randomized controlled pilot study, in which SAD patients in remission were randomly allocated to an individual format of MBCT or a control condition (i.e. treatment as usual). MBCT was given between May and June 2011, when there was no presence of depressive symptoms. The Inventory for Depressive Symptomatology Self-Report (IDS-SR), which patients received on a weekly basis from September 2011 to April 2012, was used to assess moment of recurrence (≥20) and severity at moment of recurrence.
RESULTS: 23 SAD patients were randomized to MBCT and 23 to the control condition. Kaplan-Meier survival curve showed that the groups did not differ in moment of recurrence (χ²(1).41, p=.52). T-tests showed no group difference in mean IDS-SR scores at moment of recurrence (t(31)=-.52, p=.61).
LIMITATIONS: The results are limited by small sample size (n=46) and missing data of weekly IDS-SR assessments.
CONCLUSION: The findings of this pilot RCT suggest that individual MBCT is not effective in preventing a SAD recurrence when offered in a symptom free period (i.e. spring).

PMID: 25063959 [PubMed – indexed for MEDLINE]

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Do individuals with and without depression value depression differently? And if so, why?






Do individuals with and without depression value depression differently? And if so, why?

Qual Life Res. 2015 Jun 3;

Authors: Papageorgiou K, Vermeulen KM, Schroevers MJ, Stiggelbout AM, Buskens E, Krabbe PF, van den Heuvel E, Ranchor AV

Abstract
PURPOSE: Health state valuations, used to evaluate the effectiveness of healthcare interventions, can be obtained either by the patients or by the general population. The general population seems to value somatic conditions more negatively than patients, but little is known about valuations of psychological conditions. This study examined whether individuals with and without depression differ in their valuations of depression and whether perceptions regarding depression (empathy, perceived susceptibility, stigma, illness perceptions) and individual characteristics (mastery, self-compassion, dysfunctional attitudes) bias valuations of either individuals with or without depression.
METHODS: In an online study, a general population sample used a time-trade-off task to value 30 vignettes describing depression states (four per participant) and completed questionnaires on perceptions regarding depression and individual characteristics. Participants were assigned to depression groups (with or without depression), based on the PHQ-9. A generalized linear mixed model was used to assess discrepancies in valuations and identify their determinants.
RESULTS: The sample (N = 1268) was representative of the Dutch population on age, gender, education and residence. We found that for mild depression states, individuals with depression (N = 200) valued depression more negatively than individuals without depression (N = 1068) (p = .007). Variables related to perceptions of depression and individual characteristics were not found to affect valuations of either individuals with or individuals without depression.
CONCLUSION: Since the general population values depression less negatively, using their perspective might result in less effectiveness for interventions for mild depression. Perceptions of depression or to individual characteristics did not seem to differentially affect valuations made by either individuals with or without depression.

PMID: 26038219 [PubMed – as supplied by publisher]

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Individual mindfulness-based cognitive therapy and cognitive behavior therapy for treating depressive symptoms in patients with diabetes: results of a randomized controlled trial.






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Individual mindfulness-based cognitive therapy and cognitive behavior therapy for treating depressive symptoms in patients with diabetes: results of a randomized controlled trial.

Diabetes Care. 2014 Sep;37(9):2427-34

Authors: Tovote KA, Fleer J, Snippe E, Peeters AC, Emmelkamp PM, Sanderman R, Links TP, Schroevers MJ

Abstract
OBJECTIVE: Depression is a common comorbidity of diabetes, undesirably affecting patients’ physical and mental functioning. Psychological interventions are effective treatments for depression in the general population as well as in patients with a chronic disease. The aim of this study was to assess the efficacy of individual mindfulness-based cognitive therapy (MBCT) and individual cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) in comparison with a waiting-list control condition for treating depressive symptoms in adults with type 1 or type 2 diabetes.
RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: In this randomized controlled trial, 94 outpatients with diabetes and comorbid depressive symptoms (i.e., Beck Depression Inventory-II [BDI-II] ≥14) were randomized to MBCT (n = 31), CBT (n = 32), or waiting list (n = 31). All participants completed written questionnaires and interviews at pre- and postmeasurement (3 months later). Primary outcome measure was severity of depressive symptoms (BDI-II and Toronto Hamilton Depression Rating Scale). Anxiety (Generalized Anxiety Disorder 7), well-being (Well-Being Index), diabetes-related distress (Problem Areas In Diabetes), and HbA1c levels were assessed as secondary outcomes.
RESULTS: Results showed that participants receiving MBCT and CBT reported significantly greater reductions in depressive symptoms compared with patients in the waiting-list control condition (respectively, P = 0.004 and P < 0.001; d = 0.80 and 1.00; clinically relevant improvement 26% and 29% vs. 4%). Both interventions also had significant positive effects on anxiety, well-being, and diabetes-related distress. No significant effect was found on HbA1c values.
CONCLUSIONS: Both individual MBCT and CBT are effective in improving a range of psychological symptoms in individuals with type 1 and type 2 diabetes.

PMID: 24898301 [PubMed – indexed for MEDLINE]

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The role of goal adjustment in symptoms of depression, anxiety and fatigue in cancer patients receiving psychosocial care: a longitudinal study.






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The role of goal adjustment in symptoms of depression, anxiety and fatigue in cancer patients receiving psychosocial care: a longitudinal study.
Psychol Health. 2015;30(3):268-83
Authors: Zhu L, Ranch… Continue reading

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The Temporal Order of Change in Daily Mindfulness and Affect During Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction.






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The Temporal Order of Change in Daily Mindfulness and Affect During Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction.

J Couns Psychol. 2015 Jan 26;

Authors: Snippe E, Nyklíček I, Schroevers MJ, Bos EH

Abstract
Increases in mindfulness are assumed to lead to improvements in psychological well-being during mindfulness-based treatments. However, the temporal order of this association has received little attention. This intensive longitudinal study examines whether within-person changes in mindfulness precede or follow changes in negative affect (NA) and positive affect (PA) during a mindfulness based stress reduction (MBSR) program. This study also examines interindividual differences in the association between mindfulness and affect and possible predictors of these differences. Mindfulness, NA, and PA were assessed on a daily basis in 83 individuals from the general population who participated in an MBSR program. Multilevel autoregressive models were used to investigate the temporal order of changes in mindfulness and affect. Day-to-day changes in mindfulness predicted subsequent day-to-day changes in both NA and PA, but reverse associations did not emerge. Thus, changes in mindfulness seem to precede rather than to follow changes in affect during MBSR. The magnitude of the effects differed substantially between individuals, showing that the strength of the relationship between mindfulness and affect is not the same for all participants. These between-subjects differences could not be explained by gender, age, level of education, average level of mindfulness home practice, or baseline levels of mindfulness and affect. Mindfulness home practice during the day did predict subsequent increases in mindfulness. The findings suggest that increasing mindfulness on a daily basis can be a beneficial means to improve daily psychological well-being. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

PMID: 25621590 [PubMed – as supplied by publisher]

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Valuation of depression co-occurring with a somatic condition: feasibility of the time trade-off task.






Valuation of depression co-occurring with a somatic condition: feasibility of the time trade-off task.

Health Expect. 2014 Nov 13;

Authors: Papageorgiou K, Vermeulen KM, Leijten FR, Buskens E, Ranchor AV, Schroevers MJ

Abstract
BACKGROUND: Health state valuations obtained from the general population are used for cost-utility analyses of health-care interventions. Currently, most studies have focused on valuations of somatic conditions, to a much lesser extent of mental states, that is, depression and even less on valuations of depression co-occurring with somatic conditions.
OBJECTIVE: We tested the feasibility of the time trade-off (TTO) task to elicit valuations for depression solitary or co-occurring with a somatic condition. Moreover, we explored person- and state-related factors that may affect valuations.
DESIGN: During semi-structured interviews, 10 individuals (five women, mean age: 36 years) used a TTO task to value vignettes describing mild and severe depression; and mild depression co-occurring with moderate and severe states of cancer, diabetes or heart disease. During valuations, participants were thinking aloud. Feasibility criteria were successful completion and difficulty/concentration (1-10); logical consistency of values; and comprehension of the TTO, based on qualitative analysis of think aloud data. Factors influencing valuations were generated from think aloud data.
RESULTS: Participants reported satisfactory levels of difficulty (mean: 1.9) and concentration (mean: 8.3) and assigned consistent values. Qualitative analysis revealed difficulties with imagining: living with depression for lifetime (n = 4); reaching the age of 80 (n = 6); and living with a somatic condition and mentally healthy (n = 6). Person- and state-related factors, for example perceived susceptibility to depression (n = 4), appeared to affect valuations.
CONCLUSION: Quantitative findings supported feasibility of the valuation protocol, yet qualitative findings indicated that certain task aspects should be readdressed. Factors influencing valuations can be explored to better understand valuations.

PMID: 25393599 [PubMed – as supplied by publisher]

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Testing the McSad depression specific classification system in patients with somatic conditions: validity and performance.






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Testing the McSad depression specific classification system in patients with somatic conditions: validity and performance.
Health Qual Life Outcomes. 2013;11:125
Authors: Papageorgiou K, Vermeulen K… Continue reading

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Type of social support matters for prediction of posttraumatic growth among cancer survivors.






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Type of social support matters for prediction of posttraumatic growth among cancer survivors.
Psychooncology. 2010 Jan;19(1):46-53
Authors: Schroevers MJ, Helgeson VS, Sanderman R, Ranchor AV
Abstract
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Does screening for distress efficiently uncover meetable unmet needs in cancer patients?






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Does screening for distress efficiently uncover meetable unmet needs in cancer patients?

Psychooncology. 2011 Jun;20(6):655-63

Authors: van Scheppingen C, Schroevers MJ, Smink A, van der Linden YM, Mul VE, Langendijk JA, Coyne JC, Sanderman R

Abstract
OBJECTIVES: We evaluated screening for distress in terms of its ability to uncover unmet need for psychosocial services in cancer patients. Correlates of distress, need for services and met and unmet need for services were investigated.
METHODS: Immediately after cancer treatment (T1) and 2 months later (T2), 302 patients completed the Hopkins Symptom Checklist-25 (HSCL-25) and a single question assessing the need for services. All distressed patients (HSCL-25≥39) and non-distressed patients endorsing a need for services were then called (n = 99) to assess their need.
RESULTS: Thirty-seven percent (T1) and 31% (T2) of patients were distressed and 31% (T1) and 18% (T2) expressed the need for services. Both time points showed higher distress in younger patients and females and lower distress in prostate cancer and patients treated by radiotherapy only. Less need for services was found in prostate cancer (T1), greater need was related to being single (T1) and younger (T2). Distress and need for services were positively related (p<0.001). The HSCL-25 showed modest sensitivity (T1: 0.59, T2: 0.65) and specificity (T1: 0.75, T2: 0.78) as an indicator of need for services. Interviews at T2 revealed that 51% of distressed patients needed no psychosocial services and 25% were already receiving services. At T2, regardless of distress level, 10% of all screened patients reported an unmet need for psychosocial services.
CONCLUSIONS: Depending on the clinical context, screening might be more efficient if it assessed the unmet need for services rather than distress. More attention should be concentrated on directing patients with meetable unmet needs to available services.

PMID: 21381148 [PubMed – indexed for MEDLINE]

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