Tag Archives: M.J. Schroevers

Profiles of mindfulness in cancer patients and associations with psychological outcomes and coping strategies: A person-centered approach






CONCLUSION: This study confirms the existence of distinct mindfulness profiles in cancer patients and suggest that patients high in mindfulness are the most adaptive. Continue reading

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Healthcare Utilization and Costs in Sepsis Survivors in Germany-Secondary Analysis of a Prospective Cohort Study






Background: Survivors of sepsis often face long-term sequelae after intensive care treatment. Compared to the period of hospitalization, little is known about the ambulatory healthcare utilization in sepsis patients. The study evaluated healthcare utilization and associated costs of sepsis care including allied health professions after initial hospitalization. Methods: Secondary analysis was performed on data in 210 sepsis patients prospectively enrolled from nine intensive care study centers… Continue reading

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Are cancer patients with high depressive symptom levels able to manage these symptoms without professional care? The role of coping and social support






CONCLUSIONS: A significant group of cancer patients with high levels of depressive symptoms do not seem able to effectively manage depressive symptoms by themselves, especially those more likely to avoid dealing with their symptoms. Cancer patients can be educated about avoidant coping and its possible detrimental effects, as well as being informed about possibilities of psychosocial services. Continue reading

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Experiences of Self-Criticism and Self-Compassion in People Diagnosed With Cancer: A Multimethod Qualitative Study






Objective: Self-criticism is a self-condemning and self-compassion a supportive style of self-to-self relating. These concepts have increasingly been studied in people with cancer, but mainly with quantitative studies. This study is the first to explore how adult cancer patients experience self-criticism and self-compassion in the context of their illness. Design: A multimethod qualitative study design was used, combining individual and group semi-structured interviews. Participants were 26… Continue reading

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Understanding care needs of cancer patients with depressive symptoms: The importance of patients’ recognition of depressive symptoms






CONCLUSIONS: Including assessments of patients’ recognition of depressive symptoms and their perceptions of depression treatment efficacy might improve depression screening in cancer patients by more accurately identifying those with a need for psychological care. Moreover, improving patients’ knowledge and recognition of symptoms as being depressive symptoms might be a possible target point in increasing care needs and hereby optimizing the uptake of psychological care in cancer patients with… Continue reading

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Putting mindfulness-based cognitive therapy to the test in routine clinical practice: A transdiagnostic panacea or a disorder specific intervention?






CONCLUSIONS: After MBCT, overall functioning improved in a large heterogeneous psychiatric outpatient population independent of diagnosis or comorbidity. Continue reading

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Trajectories of fatigue in cancer patients during psychological care






CONCLUSIONS: Fatigue is very common during psycho-oncological care, and notably not clinically improving. As symptoms of fatigue, depression, anxiety and physical symptoms often cluster, supplementary fatigue treatment should be considered when it is decided to treat other symptoms first. Continue reading

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Trajectories of Fatigue in Inflammatory Bowel Disease






CONCLUSIONS: The results clearly showed the existence of distinct fatigue paths over time in patients with IBD. Those reporting more chronic elevated levels of fatigue also reported greater disease activity and reduced well-being. Therefore, reducing disease activity may be important for the treatment of fatigue. In addition, given the significant association with well-being, it is possible that reducing fatigue may improve self-reported well-being. Continue reading

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A mindful yoga intervention for young women with major depressive disorder: Design and baseline sample characteristics of a randomized controlled trial






CONCLUSION: This trial will provide important information regarding the benefits of adding yoga-based interventions to TAU for young women with MDD and the mechanisms through which such benefits may occur. Continue reading

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Exploring the interconnectedness of fatigue, depression, anxiety and potential risk and protective factors in cancer patients: a network approach






Researchers have extensively studied fatigue, depression and anxiety in cancer patients. Several risk and protective factors have been identified for these symptoms. As most studies address these constructs, independently from other symptoms and potential risk and protective factors, more insight into the complex relationships among these constructs is needed. This study used the multivariate network approach to gain a better understanding of how patients’ symptoms and risk and protective… Continue reading

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