Tag Archives: M.A. Tuinman

Attitudes and Perceptions of Parenthood Among Young Adult Survivors of Childhood Cancer






Purpose: Increasing numbers of childhood cancer survivors enter adulthood and encounter decisions surrounding parenthood. However, limited research has systematically examined how childhood cancer may influence parenthood attitudes among survivors. Methods: Adult survivors of childhood cancer, who had or wanted to have children (N = 77; M(age) = 30.2 years, range: 22-43; 91% White), rated their perceived impact of cancer at enrollment and parenthood attitudes using the “Attitudes to Parenthood… Continue reading

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Effects on patient-reported outcomes of “Screening of Distress and Referral Need” implemented in Dutch oncology practice






CONCLUSIONS: After implementation of SDRN, patients report significantly fewer psychosocial (practical, social, and emotional) problems on the DT/PL but responses on the other patient-reported outcomes were comparable. These results add to the mixed evidence on the beneficial effect of distress screening. More and better focused research is needed. Continue reading

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Fertility-related knowledge and reproductive goals in childhood cancer survivors: short communication






STUDY QUESTION: Do young adult survivors of childhood cancer know their fertility status, in the context of their parenthood goals and screening for gonadal functioning? Continue reading

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Feasibility of implementing the ‘Screening for Distress and Referral Need’ process in 23 Dutch hospitals






CONCLUSIONS: The implementation of SDRN in daily practice, supported by a pre-developed implementation roadmap, is highly feasible. Continuous attention to SDRN execution, broadening implementation to all forms of cancer, and during the total disease trajectory seems vital to improve healthcare providers’ satisfaction. Continue reading

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Body issues, sexual satisfaction, and relationship status satisfaction in long-term childhood cancer survivors and healthy controls.






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Body issues, sexual satisfaction, and relationship status satisfaction in long-term childhood cancer survivors and healthy controls.

Psychooncology. 2015 May 8;

Authors: Lehmann V, Hagedoorn M, Gerhardt CA, Fults M, Olshefski RS, Sanderman R, Tuinman MA

Abstract
OBJECTIVE: Research on body image and sexual satisfaction after adult onset cancer has shown significant and lasting impairments regarding survivors’ sexuality and romantic relationships. However, knowledge about these topics and their associations in adult survivors of childhood cancer is largely lacking.
METHODS: Participants completed web-based questionnaires concerning body image, body dissociation, sexual satisfaction, and relationship status satisfaction (i.e., satisfaction with either being in a relationship or being single). Survivors (n = 87) and controls (n = 87) were matched on age and gender, with a mean age of 27 years (range: 20-40). Survivors were most often diagnosed with leukemia (46%), at an average of 16 years prior to study participation (range: 6-33 years).
RESULTS: Similar numbers of survivors and controls were single (n = 24/31), in a committed relationship (n = 33/23), or married (n = 30/33). Survivors and controls reported comparable levels of body image, body dissociation, sexual experiences, and sexual and status satisfaction (d = 0.15-0.28). Higher status satisfaction was associated with being in a relationship (compared with being single, β = 0.439), more positive body image (β = 0.196), and higher sexual satisfaction (β = 0.200).
CONCLUSIONS: Adult survivors of childhood cancer were comparable to healthy peers regarding views of their bodies and psychosexual development, which was unexpected. Independent of whether people experienced cancer or not, their status satisfaction was associated with their relationship status, body image, and sexual satisfaction. Future research should explore why sexual and body problems are identified after adult onset cancer, whereas this seems to be less of a problem in childhood cancer survivors. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

PMID: 25959111 [PubMed – as supplied by publisher]

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Body issues, sexual satisfaction, and relationship status satisfaction in long-term childhood cancer survivors and healthy controls






CONCLUSIONS: Adult survivors of childhood cancer were comparable to healthy peers regarding views of their bodies and psychosexual development, which was unexpected. Independent of whether people experienced cancer or not, their status satisfaction was associated with their relationship status, body image, and sexual satisfaction. Future research should explore why sexual and body problems are identified after adult onset cancer, whereas this seems to be less of a problem in childhood cancer… Continue reading

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Body image in cancer survivors: a systematic review of case-control studies.






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Body image in cancer survivors: a systematic review of case-control studies.

J Cancer Surviv. 2014 Dec 2;

Authors: Lehmann V, Hagedoorn M, Tuinman MA

Abstract
PURPOSE: There is common consensus that cancer and its treatment can impair the body, but combined evidence of the previous literature in cancer survivors is missing. Therefore, we reviewed body image in cancer survivors and focused on case-control studies, in order to draw conclusions as to whether body image might be altered due to cancer.
METHODS: Medline, Cinahl, Embase, and PsycInfo were searched and after duplicate extraction, 1932 hits were retrieved and screened for eligibility. Included studies were rated on selection, measurement, and reporting bias.
RESULTS: Twenty-five studies were identified using 19 different scales to measure body image. Ten studies reported a more negative body image in survivors, nine found no differences, three reported mixed findings, and three reported a more positive body image in survivors. Potential bias was common and 16 studies had at least three sources of potential bias. Less-biased studies (i.e., ≤2 sources of bias) hinted to weak differences between survivors and controls, favoring healthy controls. A meta-analysis could not be performed.
CONCLUSIONS: This review was long overdue and indicates a somewhat more negative body image in cancer survivors than healthy controls. However, numerous problems potentially biasing study results have been detected and firm conclusions cannot be drawn.
IMPLICATIONS FOR CANCER SURVIVORS: Future studies should recruit larger samples, match samples, and pay attention to how body image is conceptualized and measured in order to draw reliable conclusions as to whether body image is impaired in cancer survivors.

PMID: 25446910 [PubMed – as supplied by publisher]

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Body image in cancer survivors: a systematic review of case-control studies






CONCLUSIONS: This review was long overdue and indicates a somewhat more negative body image in cancer survivors than healthy controls. However, numerous problems potentially biasing study results have been detected and firm conclusions cannot be drawn. Continue reading

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Distress, problems and referral wish of cancer patients: differences according to relationship status and life phase.






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Distress, problems and referral wish of cancer patients: differences according to relationship status and life phase.

Psychooncology. 2014 Oct 24;

Authors: Tuinman MA, Van Nuenen FM, Hagedoorn M, Hoekstra-Weebers JE

Abstract
OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study is to examine differences in distress, problems and referral wish in cancer patients according to relationship status and life phase.
METHODS: A cross-sectional group of 1340 patients (response = 51%) completed socio-demographic and illness-related questions, and the Dutch version of the Distress Thermometer and Problem List that also assesses desire for additional care (yes, maybe and no). Relationship status was categorized into six groups (married, cohabiting, LAT (=living-apart-together: have a partner but live alone), divorced, widowed or single) and age into young (18-50), middle aged (51-65) and older (65+) cohorts.
RESULTS: Relationship status and life phase were independently related to high distress, referral wish and accordance between the latter two. Single and LAT patients were around two times more likely than married patients to be highly distressed, and wanting additional care. The same was found for younger patients as compared to 65+ patients. Whereas high distress is usually not a strong indication for additional care needs, single, LAT and younger patients most often wanted care when they were highly distressed.
CONCLUSION: Health care professionals who implement distress screening in practice can expect a higher need for additional care in single and LAT patients, but only when they are younger or middle aged. The benefit of having a partner around on a daily basis seems less important in dealing with cancer-related problems when patients are older. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

PMID: 25345693 [PubMed – as supplied by publisher]

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Distress, problems and referral wish of cancer patients: differences according to relationship status and life phase






CONCLUSION: Health care professionals who implement distress screening in practice can expect a higher need for additional care in single and LAT patients, but only when they are younger or middle aged. The benefit of having a partner around on a daily basis seems less important in dealing with cancer-related problems when patients are older. Continue reading

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