Tag Archives: J. Fleer

Quality of life and late toxicity after short-course radiotherapy followed by chemotherapy or chemoradiotherapy for locally advanced rectal cancer – The RAPIDO trial






CONCLUSION: The results demonstrate that TNT for LARC, yielding improved DrTF and pCRs, does not compromise HRQL, bowel functional or results in more grade ≥3 toxicity compared to standard chemoradiotherapy at three years after surgery in DrTF-free patients. Continue reading

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A portable isometric knee extensor strength testing device: test-retest reliability and minimal detectable change scores of the Q-Force ӀӀ in healthy adults






CONCLUSION: The portable Q-Force ӀӀ is a comfortable, responsive, and relatively cheap device with excellent test-retest reliability. This device would be potentially suitable to measure isometric knee extensor strength in clinical settings. Continue reading

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Prehabilitation to prevent complications after cardiac surgery – A retrospective study with propensity score analysis






CONCLUSIONS: Prehabilitation might be beneficial to prevent postoperative AF. Patients participated safely in prehabilitation and were not at higher risk for postoperative complications. However, well-powered randomized controlled trials are needed to confirm and deepen these results. Continue reading

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Aesthetic Outcomes of Perineal Reconstruction with the Lotus Petal Flap






CONCLUSIONS: The findings indicate that, overall, patients were moderately satisfied with the aesthetic results of their lotus petal flap reconstructions, as were the plastic surgeons and laymen. For clinical practice, it is important that the plastic surgeon manages expectations carefully before surgery, as it is possible that patients might experience a rather low aesthetic outcome after perineal reconstruction. Continue reading

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Quality of Life, Sexual Functioning, and Physical Functioning Following Perineal Reconstruction with the Lotus Petal Flap






CONCLUSIONS: Conclusions should be made with care given the small sample size. Despite a supposedly larger resection area in the LPF group, QoL was comparable in both groups. Nonetheless, reconstruction seemed to affect sexual function and physical function, not hampering overall satisfaction. Continue reading

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Heart Rehabilitation in patients awaiting Open heart surgery targeting to prevent Complications and to improve Quality of life (Heart-ROCQ): study protocol for a prospective, randomised, open, blinded endpoint (PROBE) trial






INTRODUCTION: The rising prevalence of modifiable risk factors (eg, obesity, hypertension and physical inactivity) is causing an increase in possible avoidable complications in patients undergoing cardiac surgery. This study aims to assess whether a combined preoperative and postoperative multidisciplinary cardiac rehabilitation (CR) programme (Heart-ROCQ programme) can improve functional status and reduce surgical complications, readmissions and major adverse cardiac events (MACE) as compared… Continue reading

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Response to the letter of Liccardi et al.






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Response to the letter of Liccardi et al.

COPD. 2018 Aug 02;:1

Authors: Maters GA, Pool G, Sanderman R, Wempe JB, Fleer J

PMID: 30071174 [PubMed – as supplied by publisher]

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Course and predictors of supportive care needs among Mexican breast cancer patients: A longitudinal study






CONCLUSIONS: Health system and information care needs of Mexican breast cancer patients need to be addressed with priority because these needs are the least met. Furthermore, patients with high depressive symptoms at the start of the disease trajectory have greater needs for supportive care throughout the disease trajectory. Continue reading

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Reducing discrepancies of personal goals in the context of cancer: A longitudinal study on the relation with well-being, psychological characteristics, and goal progress.






Reducing discrepancies of personal goals in the context of cancer: A longitudinal study on the relation with well-being, psychological characteristics, and goal progress.

Br J Health Psychol. 2017 Sep 27;:

Authors: Pama MR, Janse M, Sprangers MAG, Fleer J, Ranchor AV

Abstract
OBJECTIVES: To (1) examine whether reducing discrepancies between goal importance and goal attainability is an adaptive predictor of well-being, (2) investigate intrusion, awareness, optimism, and pessimism as determinants of reducing discrepancies between goal importance and goal attainability, and (3) explore how goal progress is involved in reducing discrepancies between goal importance and goal attainability during two major periods after a colorectal cancer diagnosis.
DESIGN: Prospective design.
METHODS: Newly diagnosed colorectal cancer patients (n = 120) were interviewed three times: within a month, 7 months (treatment period), and 18 months (follow-up period) post-diagnosis. Data were analysed using multiple regressions.
RESULTS: Results showed that (1) reducing discrepancies enhances well-being, (2) optimism and pessimism are predictors of reducing discrepancies during the treatment period but not during the follow-up period, while intrusion and awareness do not predict reducing discrepancies in either period, and (3) goal progress is a predictor of reducing discrepancies during the follow-up period, but no evidence for a moderating or mediating role of goal progress in the relation between psychological characteristics and reducing discrepancies was found.
CONCLUSIONS: Reducing discrepancies between goal importance and goal attainability could benefit colorectal cancer patients’ well-being. Optimism, pessimism, and goal progress appear to influence cancer patients’ ability to reduce discrepancies. Providing assistance in improving goal progress to those who are less optimistic and highly pessimistic may be a suitable training for cancer patients to prevent deterioration in well-being. Statement of contribution What is already known on this subject? More discrepancy between goal importance and goal attainability is associated with lower levels of well-being. People are able to change evaluations of importance and attainability, but it is unknown whether this positively impacts well-being. Underlying causes of differences in the extent to which discrepancies between goal importance and goal attainability are reduced are unknown. What does this study add? This is the first study to show that reducing discrepancies between goal importance and goal attainability is beneficial for well-being. This is the first study to show that optimism and pessimism are determinants of reducing discrepancies between goal importance and goal attainability. Goal progress might be an effective target for interventions that aim to facilitate one’s ability to reduce discrepancies between goal importance and goal attainability.

PMID: 28960718 [PubMed – as supplied by publisher]

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Reducing discrepancies of personal goals in the context of cancer: A longitudinal study on the relation with well-being, psychological characteristics, and goal progress






CONCLUSIONS: Reducing discrepancies between goal importance and goal attainability could benefit colorectal cancer patients’ well-being. Optimism, pessimism, and goal progress appear to influence cancer patients’ ability to reduce discrepancies. Providing assistance in improving goal progress to those who are less optimistic and highly pessimistic may be a suitable training for cancer patients to prevent deterioration in well-being. Statement of contribution What is already known on this… Continue reading

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