Tag Archives: J.C. Coyne

More Questions than Answers: Continued Critical Reanalysis of Fredrickson et al.’s Studies of Genomics and Well-Being.






More Questions than Answers: Continued Critical Reanalysis of Fredrickson et al.’s Studies of Genomics and Well-Being.
PLoS One. 2016;11(6):e0156415
Authors: Brown NJ, MacDonald DA, Samanta MP, Friedman HL, Coyne JC
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Replication initiatives will not salvage the trustworthiness of psychology.






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Replication initiatives will not salvage the trustworthiness of psychology.
BMC Psychol. 2016;4(1):28
Authors: Coyne JC
Abstract
Replication initiatives in psychology continue to gathe… Continue reading

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Exploring synergistic interactions and catalysts in complex interventions: longitudinal, mixed methods case studies of an optimised multi-level suicide prevention intervention in four european countries (Ospi-Europe).






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Exploring synergistic interactions and catalysts in complex interventions: longitudinal, mixed methods case studies of an optimised multi-level suicide prevention intervention in four european countries (Ospi-Europe).

BMC Public Health. 2016;16(1):268

Authors: Harris FM, Maxwell M, O’Connor R, Coyne JC, Arensman E, Coffey C, Koburger N, Gusmão R, Costa S, Székely A, Cserhati Z, McDaid D, van Audenhove C, Hegerl U

Abstract
BACKGROUND: The Medical Research Council (MRC) Framework for complex interventions highlights the need to explore interactions between components of complex interventions, but this has not yet been fully explored within complex, non-pharmacological interventions. This paper draws on the process evaluation data of a suicide prevention programme implemented in four European countries to illustrate the synergistic interactions between intervention levels in a complex programme, and to present our method for exploring these.
METHODS: A realist evaluation approach informed the process evaluation, which drew on mixed methods, longitudinal case studies. Data collection consisted of 47 semi-structured interviews, 12 focus groups, one workshop, fieldnoted observations of six programme meetings and 20 questionnaires (delivered at six month intervals to each of the four intervention sites). Analysis drew on the framework approach, facilitated by the use of QSR NVivo (v10). Our qualitative approach to exploring synergistic interactions (QuaSIC) also developed a matrix of hypothesised synergies that were explored within one workshop and two waves of data collection.
RESULTS: All four implementation countries provided examples of synergistic interactions that added value beyond the sum of individual intervention levels or components in isolation. For instance, the launch ceremony of the public health campaign (a level 3 intervention) in Ireland had an impact on the community-based professional training, increasing uptake and visibility of training for journalists in particular. In turn, this led to increased media reporting of OSPI activities (monitored as part of the public health campaign) and also led to wider dissemination of editorial guidelines for responsible reporting of suicidal acts. Analysis of the total process evaluation dataset also revealed the new phenomenon of the OSPI programme acting as a catalyst for externally generated (and funded) activity that shared the goals of suicide prevention.
CONCLUSIONS: The QuaSIC approach enabled us to develop and refine our definition of synergistic interactions and add the innovative concept of catalytic effects. This represents a novel approach to the evaluation of complex interventions. By exploring synergies and catalytic interactions related to a complex intervention or programme, we reveal the added value to planned activities and how they might be maximised.

PMID: 26979461 [PubMed – in process]

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Results of the PACE follow-up study are uninterpretable.






Results of the PACE follow-up study are uninterpretable.
Lancet Psychiatry. 2016 Jan 18;
Authors: Coyne JC, Laws KR
PMID: 26795757 [PubMed – as supplied by publisher]

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Role of patient treatment beliefs and provider characteristics in establishing patient-provider relationships.






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Role of patient treatment beliefs and provider characteristics in establishing patient-provider relationships.
Fam Pract. 2015 Apr;32(2):224-31
Authors: Lee King PA, Cederbaum JA, Kurzban S, Norton T… Continue reading

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The Elusory Upward Spiral: A Reanalysis of Kok et al. (2013).






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The Elusory Upward Spiral: A Reanalysis of Kok et al. (2013).
Psychol Sci. 2015 Jul;26(7):1140-3
Authors: Heathers JA, Brown NJ, Coyne JC, Friedman HL
PMID: 26025022 [PubMed – indexed for MEDL… Continue reading

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Is implementing screening for distress an efficient means to recruit patients to a psychological intervention trial?






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Is implementing screening for distress an efficient means to recruit patients to a psychological intervention trial?
Psychooncology. 2014 May;23(5):516-23
Authors: van Scheppingen C, Schroevers MJ, P… Continue reading

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A critical reanalysis of the relationship between genomics and well-being.






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A critical reanalysis of the relationship between genomics and well-being.
Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2014 Sep 2;111(35):12705-9
Authors: Brown NJ, MacDonald DA, Samanta MP, Friedman HL, Coyne JC
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The effects of a problem solving-based intervention on depressive symptoms and HIV medication adherence are independent.






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The effects of a problem solving-based intervention on depressive symptoms and HIV medication adherence are independent.

PLoS One. 2014;9(1):e84952

Authors: Gross R, Bellamy SL, Chapman J, Han X, O’Duor J, Strom BL, Houts PS, Palmer SC, Coyne JC

Abstract
Depression and depressive symptoms predict poor adherence to medical therapy, but the association is complex, nonspecific, and difficult to interpret. Understanding this association may help to identify the mechanism explaining the results of interventions that improve both medical therapy adherence and depressive symptoms as well as determine the importance of targeting depression in adherence interventions. We previously demonstrated that Managed Problem Solving (MAPS) focused on HIV medication adherence improved adherence and viral load in patients initiating a new antiretroviral regimen. Here, we assessed whether MAPS improved depressive symptoms and in turn, whether changes in depressive symptoms mediated changes in adherence and treatment outcomes. We compared MAPS to usual care with respect to presence of depressive symptoms during the trial using logistic regression. We then assessed whether MAPS’ effect on depressive symptoms mediated the relationship between MAPS and adherence and virologic outcomes using linear and logistic regression, respectively. Mediation was defined by the disappearance of the mathematical association between MAPS and the outcomes when the proposed mediator was included in regression models. Although MAPS participants had a lower rate of depressive symptoms (OR = 0.45, 95% confidence interval 0.21-0.93), there was no evidence of mediation of the effects of MAPS on adherence and virological outcome by improvements in depression. Thus, interventions for medication adherence may not need to address depressive symptoms in order to impact both adherence and depression; this remains to be confirmed, however, in other data.

PMID: 24400124 [PubMed – indexed for MEDLINE]

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Depression screening and patient outcomes in pregnancy or postpartum: a systematic review.






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Depression screening and patient outcomes in pregnancy or postpartum: a systematic review.
J Psychosom Res. 2014 Jun;76(6):433-46
Authors: Thombs BD, Arthurs E, Coronado-Montoya S, Roseman M, Delisle… Continue reading

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