Tag Archives: J.C. Coyne

Prevention of suicidal behaviour: Results of a controlled community-based intervention study in four European countries






The ‘European Alliance Against Depression’ community-based intervention approach simultaneously targets depression and suicidal behaviour by a multifaceted community based intervention and has been implemented in more than 115 regions worldwide. The two main aims of the European Union funded project “Optimizing Suicide Prevention Programmes and Their Implementation in Europe” were to optimise this approach and to evaluate its implementation and impact. This paper reports on the primary outcome… Continue reading

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Extraordinary claims require compelling evidence: Concerns about “loving-kindness meditation slows biological aging in novices”.






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Extraordinary claims require compelling evidence: Concerns about “loving-kindness meditation slows biological aging in novices”.
Psychoneuroendocrinology. 2019 Aug 17;:104410
Authors: Friedman HL, Ma… Continue reading

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Extraordinary claims require compelling evidence: Concerns about “loving-kindness meditation slows biological aging in novices”






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Does Twitter language reliably predict heart disease? A commentary on Eichstaedt et al. (2015a).






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Does Twitter language reliably predict heart disease? A commentary on Eichstaedt et al. (2015a).

PeerJ. 2018;6:e5656

Authors: Brown NJL, Coyne JC

Abstract
We comment on Eichstaedt et al.’s (2015a) claim to have shown that language patterns among Twitter users, aggregated at the level of US counties, predicted county-level mortality rates from atherosclerotic heart disease (AHD), with “negative” language being associated with higher rates of death from AHD and “positive” language associated with lower rates. First, we examine some of Eichstaedt et al.’s apparent assumptions about the nature of AHD, as well as some issues related to the secondary analysis of online data and to considering counties as communities. Next, using the data files supplied by Eichstaedt et al., we reproduce their regression- and correlation-based models, substituting mortality from an alternative cause of death-namely, suicide-as the outcome variable, and observe that the purported associations between “negative” and “positive” language and mortality are reversed when suicide is used as the outcome variable. We identify numerous other conceptual and methodological limitations that call into question the robustness and generalizability of Eichstaedt et al.’s claims, even when these are based on the results of their ridge regression/machine learning model. We conclude that there is no good evidence that analyzing Twitter data in bulk in this way can add anything useful to our ability to understand geographical variation in AHD mortality rates.

PMID: 30258732 [PubMed]

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Does Twitter language reliably predict heart disease? A commentary on Eichstaedt et al. (2015a)






We comment on Eichstaedt et al.’s (2015a) claim to have shown that language patterns among Twitter users, aggregated at the level of US counties, predicted county-level mortality rates from atherosclerotic heart disease (AHD), with “negative” language being associated with higher rates of death from AHD and “positive” language associated with lower rates. First, we examine some of Eichstaedt et al.’s apparent assumptions about the nature of AHD, as well as some issues related to the secondary… Continue reading

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One-year follow-up of a randomized controlled trial of sertraline and cognitive behavior group therapy in depressed primary care patients (MIND study).






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One-year follow-up of a randomized controlled trial of sertraline and cognitive behavior group therapy in depressed primary care patients (MIND study).
J Affect Disord. 2018 Jan 02;230:15-21
Authors: … Continue reading

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One-year follow-up of a randomized controlled trial of sertraline and cognitive behavior group therapy in depressed primary care patients (MIND study)






CONCLUSIONS: Sertraline and group CBT have similar anti-depressive effects in the long-term course of mild-to-moderate depression. Regarding long-term global functioning, sertraline seems to be slightly superior to CBT. Continue reading

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Emodiversity: Robust predictor of outcomes or statistical artifact?






Emodiversity: Robust predictor of outcomes or statistical artifact?
J Exp Psychol Gen. 2017 Sep;146(9):1372-1377
Authors: Brown NJL, Coyne JC
Abstract
This article examines the concept of emodiversity… Continue reading

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Emodiversity: Robust predictor of outcomes or statistical artifact?






This article examines the concept of emodiversity, put forward by Quoidbach et al. (2014) as a novel source of information about “the health of the human emotional ecosystem” (p. 2057). Quoidbach et al. drew an analogy between emodiversity as a desirable property of a person’s emotional make-up and biological diversity as a desirable property of an ecosystem. They claimed that emodiversity was an independent predictor of better mental and physical health outcomes in two large-scale studies…. Continue reading

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More Questions than Answers: Continued Critical Reanalysis of Fredrickson et al.’s Studies of Genomics and Well-Being.






More Questions than Answers: Continued Critical Reanalysis of Fredrickson et al.’s Studies of Genomics and Well-Being.
PLoS One. 2016;11(6):e0156415
Authors: Brown NJ, MacDonald DA, Samanta MP, Friedman HL, Coyne JC
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