Tag Archives: H.P. Hagedoorn

A web-based self-help intervention for partners of cancer patients based on Acceptance and Commitment Therapy: a protocol of a randomized controlled trial.






A web-based self-help intervention for partners of cancer patients based on Acceptance and Commitment Therapy: a protocol of a randomized controlled trial.

BMC Public Health. 2015;15(1):303

Authors: Köhle N, Drossaert CH, Schreurs KM, Hagedoorn M, Verdonck-de Leeuw IM, Bohlmeijer ET

Abstract
BACKGROUND: There is a growing recognition that cancer not only affects the lives of the patients, but also the lives of their partners. Partners of cancer patients are highly involved in the illness trajectory by providing informal care and they often experience distress. However, supporting interventions for this group are scarce and existing interventions bear several limitations. On the basis of the need for theory- and evidence-based supportive interventions for partners of cancer patients, the web-based self-help intervention Hold on, for each other has been developed. This intervention is based on Acceptance and Commitment Therapy. The primary objective of the RCT is to investigate the (cost-) effectiveness of the intervention. Additional goals are (1) to examine if psychological flexibility, self-compassion, mastery, supportive behavior, posttraumatic growth and resilience are mediators of the intervention’s effects on the partners’ mental health; (2) to examine the moderating effects of the socio demographics (age, gender, education, working situation, family situation) and disease-related characteristics of the patients (sort of cancer, stage of disease, duration and treatment of cancer); and (3) to investigate to what extend participants are satisfied with the intervention, which parts of the intervention are mostly used, and how adherent the users are.
METHODS/DESIGN: A three-armed randomized controlled trial (RCT) will be conducted to compare two versions of the intervention Hold on, for each other with a waiting list control condition. Both intervention conditions contain the same content and differ only with regard to the form of professional support (personal support versus automatic support). Adult partners of cancer patients with mild to moderate depressive and anxiety symptoms, will be recruited through a multi-component strategy. Online measurements by self-assessment will be made on four measurement points (prior to randomization (baseline-measurement) and 3, 6 and 12 months after baseline).
DISCUSSION: When proven effective, Hold on, for each other can be an invaluable contribution to the healthcare system and it could be offered to all partners of cancer patients who are in need for additional support.
TRIAL REGISTRATION: Dutch Trial Register, trial registration number NTR4035 , date of registration: 17 March 2013.

PMID: 25884187 [PubMed – as supplied by publisher]

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Dyadic Coping Within Couples Dealing With Breast Cancer: A Longitudinal, Population-Based Study.






Dyadic Coping Within Couples Dealing With Breast Cancer: A Longitudinal, Population-Based Study.

Health Psychol. 2015 Mar 2;

Authors: Rottmann N, Hansen DG, Larsen PV, Nicolaisen A, Flyger H, Johansen C, Hagedoorn M

Abstract
Objective: The way couples deal with stressors is likely to influence their adjustment after breast cancer diagnosis. Based on the systemic-transactional model, this study examined whether the supportive, delegated and negative dyadic coping provided by patients and partners and their common dyadic coping as a couple were associated with change in relationship quality and depressive symptoms over time. Method: Women with breast cancer and their male partners (N = 538 couples) participated in a longitudinal study (Time 1, ≤4 months after surgery; Time 2, 5 months later). Dyadic coping was assessed using the Dyadic Coping Inventory (Bodenmann, 2008). The Center for Epidemiologic Studies-Depression Scale (Radloff, 1977) and the Relationship Ladder (Kuijer, Buunk, De Jong, Ybema, & Sanderman, 2004) measured depressive symptoms and relationship quality, respectively. Results: Negative dyadic coping was adversely associated with both patients’ and partners’ outcomes. The more patients rated the couple as engaging in common dyadic coping, the higher relationship quality and the fewer depressive symptoms both patients and partners experienced. Patients experienced more depressive symptoms the more delegated coping (i.e., taking over tasks) they provided to the partner. Partners experienced fewer depressive symptoms the more delegated coping they provided to the patient, but more depressive symptoms the more supportive coping the patient provided to them. Conclusion: This study has contributed to disentangling how dyadic coping behaviors influence couples’ adjustment. Interventions may focus on reducing negative dyadic coping and strengthening common dyadic coping, and be attentive to the different effects of dyadic coping on patients and partners. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

PMID: 25730611 [PubMed – as supplied by publisher]

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Participation in questionnaire studies among couples affected by breast cancer.






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Participation in questionnaire studies among couples affected by breast cancer.

Support Care Cancer. 2014 Dec 10;

Authors: Terp H, Rottmann N, Larsen PV, Hagedoorn M, Flyger H, Kroman N, Johansen C, Dalton S, Hansen DG

Abstract
OBJECTIVE: Participation bias may be a problem in couple-based psychosocial studies. Therefore, it is important to investigate the characteristics associated with participation. The aim of this study was to analyze whether participation in a longitudinal psychosocial questionnaire study among couples affected by breast cancer was associated with socioeconomic, breast cancer-specific, and other health-related characteristics of the patients and partners.
METHODS: The analyzes are based on 2254 couples who were invited to participate in a nationwide survey on psychosocial adjustment among couples dealing with breast cancer. Participating couples (N = 792) were compared with non-participating couples (N = 1462) with regard to socioeconomic and health-related characteristics obtained from nationwide clinical and administrative registers.
RESULTS: Associations were seen between various socioeconomic variables and couple participation. The patient characteristics older age (OR = 0.15 [95 % CI = 0.07-0.55]), low education (OR = 1.95 [95 % CI = 1.46-2.68]), disability pension (OR = 0.59 [95 % CI = 0.39-0.55]), or non-western ethnicity (OR = 0.36 [95 % CI = 0.15-0.82]) reduced couple participation. The partner characteristics older age (OR = 0.23 [95 % CI = 0.15-0.43]), low education (OR = 1.67 [95 % CI = 1.25-2.22]), receiving disability pension (OR = 0.46 [95 % CI = 0.25-0.82]), non-western ethnicity (OR = 0.17 [95 % CI = 0.06-0.49]), or high morbidity (OR = 0.76 [95 % CI = 0.60-0.96]) also reduced couple participation. Furthermore, couples with low income (OR = 1.49 [95 % CI = 1.16-1.95]) had reduced participation. No associations were found between couple participation and breast cancer-related variables.
CONCLUSIONS: Socioeconomic characteristics of patients and partners, and morbidity of partners may influence participation in couple-based psychosocial breast cancer research. Breast cancer-related characteristics do not seem to influence participation.

PMID: 25487844 [PubMed – as supplied by publisher]

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Negative and positive consequences of adolescent cancer 10 years after diagnosis: an interview-based longitudinal study in Sweden.






Negative and positive consequences of adolescent cancer 10 years after diagnosis: an interview-based longitudinal study in Sweden.

Psychooncology. 2014 Apr 15;

Authors: Lehmann V, Grönqvist H, Engvall G, Ander M, Tuinman MA, Hagedoorn M, Sanderman R, Mattsson E, von Essen L

Abstract
OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to provide insight into survivor-reported negative and positive consequences of cancer during adolescence 10 years after diagnosis and compare these with consequences reported 3 and 4 years after diagnosis.
METHODS: Three, 4, and 10 years after diagnosis, survivors of adolescent cancer were interviewed about negative and positive consequences due to their cancer experience. Manifest content analysis was used to identify categories of reported consequences. Categories of consequences 10 years after diagnosis were compared with consequences reported 3 and 4 years after diagnosis.
RESULTS: Seven categories of negative consequences were identified: bodily concerns, existential thoughts about loss and life (new at 10 years), psychological problems, difficulties interacting with others, health worries (new), fertility concerns (new), and frustrations about health care (new); and six categories of positive consequences: positive view of life, positive view of self, compassion for others (new), close relationships, gained knowledge about disease and health care, and financial gains. Consistent with previous time points, bodily concerns were reported most often. The majority of survivors (n = 22) reported both negative and positive consequences of their former disease. Few reported only negative (n = 2) or only positive consequences (n = 4).
CONCLUSIONS: Ten years after diagnosis, most survivors reported both negative and positive consequences. New themes, relevant to young adulthood and long-term survival, were identified. Health care professionals treating young adult survivors may anticipate and address problems regarding physical health, fertility, and health care but may also reinforce positive affect by addressing survivors’ positive views of life, sense of self, and close relationships. © 2014 The Authors. Psycho-Oncology published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

PMID: 24737637 [PubMed – as supplied by publisher]

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