Tag Archives: H.P. Hagedoorn

The impact of older person’s frailty on the care-related quality of life of their informal caregiver over time: results from the TOPICS-MDS project.






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The impact of older person’s frailty on the care-related quality of life of their informal caregiver over time: results from the TOPICS-MDS project.

Qual Life Res. 2017 May 31;:

Authors: Oldenkamp M, Hagedoorn M, Wittek R, Stolk R, Smidt N

Abstract
PURPOSE: To examine the impact of changes in an older person’s frailty on the care-related quality of life of their informal caregiver.
METHODS: Five research projects in the TOPICS-MDS database with data of both older person and informal caregiver at baseline and after 12 months follow-up were selected. Frailty was measured in five health domains (functional limitations, psychological well-being, social functioning, health-related quality of life, self-rated health). Care-related quality of life was measured with the Care-Related Quality of Life instrument (CarerQoL-7D), containing two positive (fulfilment, perceived support) and five negative dimensions (relational problems, mental health problems, physical health problems, financial problems, problems combining informal care with daily activities).
RESULTS: 660 older person/caregiver couples were included. Older persons were on average 79 (SD 6.9) years of age, and 61% was female. Caregivers were on average 65 (SD 12.6) years of age, and 68% was female. Results of the multivariable linear and logistic regression analyses showed that an increase in older person’s frailty over time was related to a lower total care-related quality of life of the caregiver, and to more mental and physical health problems, and problems with combining informal care with daily activities at follow-up. A change in the older person’s psychological well-being was most important for the caregiver’s care-related quality of life, compared to the other health domains.
CONCLUSIONS: Health professionals observing decreasing psychological well-being of an older person and increasing hours of informal care provision should be aware of the considerable problems this may bring to their informal caregiver, and should tailor interventions to support informal caregivers according to their specific needs and problems.

PMID: 28567602 [PubMed – as supplied by publisher]

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Chronic multimorbidity impairs role functioning in middle-aged and older individuals mostly when non-partnered or living alone.






Chronic multimorbidity impairs role functioning in middle-aged and older individuals mostly when non-partnered or living alone.

PLoS One. 2017;12(2):e0170525

Authors: Müller F, Hagedoorn M, Tuinman MA

Abstract
BACKGROUND: Due to the aging of the population, society includes a growing proportion of older individuals prone to chronic morbidity. This study aimed to investigate the adverse effects of single and multiple chronic morbidity on psychosocial health and whether these effects are more pronounced in individuals who are non-partnered or living alone.
MATERIALS AND METHODS: Baseline data from the ‘Lifelines Cohort Study’ collected between 2006 and 2013 in the Netherlands were used. Individuals aged 50+ (n = 25,214) were categorized according to their health status (healthy, single chronic morbidity, multiple chronic morbidity), relationship status (partnered, non-partnered), and living arrangement (living with someone, living alone). Analyses of covariance (ANCOVA) were performed to study the main- and the interaction-effects on mental health and role functioning as assessed with the RAND-36.
RESULTS: Irrespective of having chronic morbidity, having a partner was associated with better mental health when partners shared a home. Individuals with single and especially multiple chronic morbidity had impaired role functioning. Having a partner mitigated the adverse effects of multimorbidity on role functioning, but only in individuals who shared a home with their partner. Non-partnered individuals with multimorbidity and those not sharing a home with their partner demonstrated impaired role functioning.
CONCLUSIONS: The results demonstrate that multimorbidity negatively affects role functioning, but not the mental health, of middle-aged and older individuals. Sharing a home with a partner can mitigate these adverse effects, while other combinations of relationship status and living arrangement do not. Offering intervention to those individuals most vulnerable to impaired functioning may relieve some of the increasing pressure on the health care system. An individual’s relationship status along with one’s living arrangement could foster the identification of a target group for such interventions attempting to sustain physical functioning or to adapt daily goals.

PMID: 28151967 [PubMed – in process]

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Survey nonresponse among informal caregivers: effects on the presence and magnitude of associations with caregiver burden and satisfaction.






Survey nonresponse among informal caregivers: effects on the presence and magnitude of associations with caregiver burden and satisfaction.

BMC Public Health. 2016;16(1):480

Authors: Oldenkamp M, Wittek RP, Hagedoorn M, Stolk RP, Smidt N

Abstract
BACKGROUND: Informal caregiving is becoming more relevant with current trends such as population ageing. However, little is known about nonconsent and nonresponse bias in caregiving research. We investigated nonconsent and nonresponse bias in a sample of informal caregivers who participated in the LifeLines Cohort Study, and were invited for participation in an additional caregiving study.
METHODS: We compared socio-demographic characteristics, caregiver health, caregiving situation, and caregiver outcomes of nonconsent and consent caregivers, and nonresponse and response caregivers, on LifeLines data, by using Chi-square tests, Independent Sample T-tests, and Mann-Whitney tests. Furthermore, we examined the influence of nonconsent and nonresponse on the presence and magnitude of the associations between caregiver characteristics and two commonly used caregiving outcomes (caregiver burden and satisfaction). We conducted multinomial logistic regression analyses, including interaction terms with nonconsent and nonresponse.
RESULTS: Within a subcohort of 8443 caregivers, aged >18 years, 5095 caregivers (60 %) gave consent for participation in the caregiving study. Within the subgroup of 2002 caregivers who received the questionnaire, 965 (48 %) responded. Caregivers who were highly involved in caregiving (i.e. high time investment, high caregiver burden), gave more commonly consent to participate, and responded more often to the questionnaire. Nonconsent and nonresponse influenced the associations between caregiver characteristics and caregiver burden for only a few characteristics, mainly indicating the level of caregiving involvement (e.g. time investment, caregiving duration). Especially for caregiver burden, these indicators were stronger for consent and response caregivers than for nonconsent and nonresponse caregivers.
CONCLUSIONS: Our findings are important for caregiving research, as they emphasized that participation might not be evenly distributed among caregivers, and that the possibility of nonconsent and nonresponse bias should be considered.

PMID: 27278386 [PubMed – in process]

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Caregiving demands and caregivers’ psychological outcomes: The mediating role of perceived injustice.






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Caregiving demands and caregivers’ psychological outcomes: The mediating role of perceived injustice.
Clin Rehabil. 2016 Apr 28;
Authors: Mohammadi S, de Boer MJ, Sanderman R, Hagedoorn M
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Depressive symptom trajectories in women affected by breast cancer and their male partners: a nationwide prospective cohort study.






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Depressive symptom trajectories in women affected by breast cancer and their male partners: a nationwide prospective cohort study.

J Cancer Surviv. 2016 Apr 15;

Authors: Rottmann N, Hansen DG, Hagedoorn M, Larsen PV, Nicolaisen A, Bidstrup PE, Würtzen H, Flyger H, Kroman N, Johansen C

Abstract
PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to identify subgroups of breast cancer patients and their partners based on distinct trajectories of depressive symptoms, to examine how relationship quality and medical and sociodemographic factors were associated with these trajectories, and to explore whether patients and partners had similar trajectories.
METHODS: A nationwide, population-based cohort of couples dealing with breast cancer was established in Denmark. Participants completed the Center for Epidemiologic Studies-Depression Scale at baseline and 5 and 12 months later. Sociodemographic and medical characteristics were retrieved from registers. A trajectory finite mixture model was used to identify trajectories.
RESULTS: The trajectories of depressive symptoms over time were analyzed in 546 patients and 508 partners. Among patients, 13 % had a high stable trajectory, 38 % an intermediate decreasing trajectory, and 49 % a low trajectory. Similar trajectories were found for partners (11, 22, and 67 %, respectively). Compared to the low trajectory, trajectories with higher depressive symptoms were associated with poorer relationship quality and previous use of antidepressants for patients and partners and with younger age, comorbidity, basic education, and chemotherapy for patients. The trajectories of patients and their partners were weakly correlated.
CONCLUSIONS: A considerable minority of patients and partners had a persistently high level of depressive symptoms. Poorer relationship quality and previous antidepressant use most consistently characterized patients and partners with higher depressive symptom trajectories.
IMPLICATIONS FOR CANCER SURVIVORS: In clinical practice, attention to differences in depressive symptom trajectories is important to identify and target patients and partners who might need support.

PMID: 27084710 [PubMed – as supplied by publisher]

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The buffering effect of family functioning on the psychological consequences of headache.






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The buffering effect of family functioning on the psychological consequences of headache.

Psychol Health Med. 2016 Feb 17;:1-7

Authors: Mohammadi S, Zandieh S, Dehghani M, Assarzadegan F, Sanderman R, Hagedoorn M

Abstract
The current study aimed to examine whether high family functioning mitigates the association between headache intensity and distress. The sample consisted of 124 patients with chronic or recurrent headache. Patients completed validated questionnaires about headache intensity, family functioning, and distress. Hierarchical regression analyses were performed to examine the interaction between headache intensity and family functioning on distress. Headache intensity was positively associated with distress (r = .28, p = .002). As hypothesized, family functioning moderated this association (B = -.01, p = .023). More specifically, the positive association between headache intensity and distress was significant only among patients with lower family functioning (B = .01, p < .001) and not among patients with higher levels of family functioning (B = .006, p = .075). Functional families appear to buffer the distress level in patients; they showed relatively low levels of distress regardless of the severity of their headache. In contrast, patients with dysfunctional families who experienced more pain reported more distress, presumably because they did not receive adequate help and support from these families. This study underlines the importance of a broader perspective on family dynamics in coping with pain.

PMID: 26885696 [PubMed – as supplied by publisher]

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Using Marital Status and Continuous Marital Satisfaction Ratings to Predict Depressive Symptoms in Married and Unmarried Women with Systemic Sclerosis: A Canadian Scleroderma Research Group Study.






Using Marital Status and Continuous Marital Satisfaction Ratings to Predict Depressive Symptoms in Married and Unmarried Women with Systemic Sclerosis: A Canadian Scleroderma Research Group Study.
Arthritis Care Res (Hoboken)… Continue reading

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A web-based self-help intervention for partners of cancer patients based on Acceptance and Commitment Therapy: a protocol of a randomized controlled trial.






A web-based self-help intervention for partners of cancer patients based on Acceptance and Commitment Therapy: a protocol of a randomized controlled trial.

BMC Public Health. 2015;15(1):303

Authors: Köhle N, Drossaert CH, Schreurs KM, Hagedoorn M, Verdonck-de Leeuw IM, Bohlmeijer ET

Abstract
BACKGROUND: There is a growing recognition that cancer not only affects the lives of the patients, but also the lives of their partners. Partners of cancer patients are highly involved in the illness trajectory by providing informal care and they often experience distress. However, supporting interventions for this group are scarce and existing interventions bear several limitations. On the basis of the need for theory- and evidence-based supportive interventions for partners of cancer patients, the web-based self-help intervention Hold on, for each other has been developed. This intervention is based on Acceptance and Commitment Therapy. The primary objective of the RCT is to investigate the (cost-) effectiveness of the intervention. Additional goals are (1) to examine if psychological flexibility, self-compassion, mastery, supportive behavior, posttraumatic growth and resilience are mediators of the intervention’s effects on the partners’ mental health; (2) to examine the moderating effects of the socio demographics (age, gender, education, working situation, family situation) and disease-related characteristics of the patients (sort of cancer, stage of disease, duration and treatment of cancer); and (3) to investigate to what extend participants are satisfied with the intervention, which parts of the intervention are mostly used, and how adherent the users are.
METHODS/DESIGN: A three-armed randomized controlled trial (RCT) will be conducted to compare two versions of the intervention Hold on, for each other with a waiting list control condition. Both intervention conditions contain the same content and differ only with regard to the form of professional support (personal support versus automatic support). Adult partners of cancer patients with mild to moderate depressive and anxiety symptoms, will be recruited through a multi-component strategy. Online measurements by self-assessment will be made on four measurement points (prior to randomization (baseline-measurement) and 3, 6 and 12 months after baseline).
DISCUSSION: When proven effective, Hold on, for each other can be an invaluable contribution to the healthcare system and it could be offered to all partners of cancer patients who are in need for additional support.
TRIAL REGISTRATION: Dutch Trial Register, trial registration number NTR4035 , date of registration: 17 March 2013.

PMID: 25884187 [PubMed – as supplied by publisher]

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Dyadic Coping Within Couples Dealing With Breast Cancer: A Longitudinal, Population-Based Study.






Dyadic Coping Within Couples Dealing With Breast Cancer: A Longitudinal, Population-Based Study.

Health Psychol. 2015 Mar 2;

Authors: Rottmann N, Hansen DG, Larsen PV, Nicolaisen A, Flyger H, Johansen C, Hagedoorn M

Abstract
Objective: The way couples deal with stressors is likely to influence their adjustment after breast cancer diagnosis. Based on the systemic-transactional model, this study examined whether the supportive, delegated and negative dyadic coping provided by patients and partners and their common dyadic coping as a couple were associated with change in relationship quality and depressive symptoms over time. Method: Women with breast cancer and their male partners (N = 538 couples) participated in a longitudinal study (Time 1, ≤4 months after surgery; Time 2, 5 months later). Dyadic coping was assessed using the Dyadic Coping Inventory (Bodenmann, 2008). The Center for Epidemiologic Studies-Depression Scale (Radloff, 1977) and the Relationship Ladder (Kuijer, Buunk, De Jong, Ybema, & Sanderman, 2004) measured depressive symptoms and relationship quality, respectively. Results: Negative dyadic coping was adversely associated with both patients’ and partners’ outcomes. The more patients rated the couple as engaging in common dyadic coping, the higher relationship quality and the fewer depressive symptoms both patients and partners experienced. Patients experienced more depressive symptoms the more delegated coping (i.e., taking over tasks) they provided to the partner. Partners experienced fewer depressive symptoms the more delegated coping they provided to the patient, but more depressive symptoms the more supportive coping the patient provided to them. Conclusion: This study has contributed to disentangling how dyadic coping behaviors influence couples’ adjustment. Interventions may focus on reducing negative dyadic coping and strengthening common dyadic coping, and be attentive to the different effects of dyadic coping on patients and partners. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

PMID: 25730611 [PubMed – as supplied by publisher]

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Participation in questionnaire studies among couples affected by breast cancer.






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Participation in questionnaire studies among couples affected by breast cancer.

Support Care Cancer. 2014 Dec 10;

Authors: Terp H, Rottmann N, Larsen PV, Hagedoorn M, Flyger H, Kroman N, Johansen C, Dalton S, Hansen DG

Abstract
OBJECTIVE: Participation bias may be a problem in couple-based psychosocial studies. Therefore, it is important to investigate the characteristics associated with participation. The aim of this study was to analyze whether participation in a longitudinal psychosocial questionnaire study among couples affected by breast cancer was associated with socioeconomic, breast cancer-specific, and other health-related characteristics of the patients and partners.
METHODS: The analyzes are based on 2254 couples who were invited to participate in a nationwide survey on psychosocial adjustment among couples dealing with breast cancer. Participating couples (N = 792) were compared with non-participating couples (N = 1462) with regard to socioeconomic and health-related characteristics obtained from nationwide clinical and administrative registers.
RESULTS: Associations were seen between various socioeconomic variables and couple participation. The patient characteristics older age (OR = 0.15 [95 % CI = 0.07-0.55]), low education (OR = 1.95 [95 % CI = 1.46-2.68]), disability pension (OR = 0.59 [95 % CI = 0.39-0.55]), or non-western ethnicity (OR = 0.36 [95 % CI = 0.15-0.82]) reduced couple participation. The partner characteristics older age (OR = 0.23 [95 % CI = 0.15-0.43]), low education (OR = 1.67 [95 % CI = 1.25-2.22]), receiving disability pension (OR = 0.46 [95 % CI = 0.25-0.82]), non-western ethnicity (OR = 0.17 [95 % CI = 0.06-0.49]), or high morbidity (OR = 0.76 [95 % CI = 0.60-0.96]) also reduced couple participation. Furthermore, couples with low income (OR = 1.49 [95 % CI = 1.16-1.95]) had reduced participation. No associations were found between couple participation and breast cancer-related variables.
CONCLUSIONS: Socioeconomic characteristics of patients and partners, and morbidity of partners may influence participation in couple-based psychosocial breast cancer research. Breast cancer-related characteristics do not seem to influence participation.

PMID: 25487844 [PubMed – as supplied by publisher]

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