Monthly Archives: January 2021

The relationship between quality of life and coping strategies of children with EB and their parents






CONCLUSION: Children who are able to accept the disease or distance themselves from it appear to be better off in contrast to those who tend to engage in the cognitive-palliative strategies and expressing emotional reactions. Parents seem to be better off when they are able to use avoidance in contrast to those who tend to show emotional reactions. Further research is needed to substantiate these findings. Continue reading

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Psychological outcomes, knowledge and preferences of pregnant women on first-trimester screening for fetal structural abnormalities: A prospective cohort study






CONCLUSIONS: The 13-week scan did not negatively impact the psychological well-being of pregnant women. The small number of women with screen-positive results temporarily experienced higher anxiety after the scan but, in false-positive cases, anxiety levels normalized again when the abnormality was not confirmed at follow-up scans. Finally, most pregnant women have moderate-to-high levels of knowledge and strongly prefer early screening for fetal structural abnormalities. Continue reading

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Recruiting participants for an international mHealth study via Facebook Ads: Experiences from the Untire App RCT.






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Recruiting participants for an international mHealth study via Facebook Ads: Experiences from the Untire App RCT.

Internet Interv. 2021 Mar;23:100362

Authors: Spahrkäs SS, Looijmans A, Sanderman R, Hagedoorn M

Abstract
Introduction: Social media recruitment via Facebook Ads seems to be a promising method for large-scale international trials examining the effectiveness of mHealth interventions. However, little is known about this method in terms of strategy, reach, and costs in the context of psycho-oncology. This paper presents the results of the recruitment strategy that was applied in the Untire app study and shows how many participants could be reached using advertisements (i.e., Ads) on Facebook, who participated, and what it cost.
Method: The Untire app study is a randomized controlled trial targeted at cancer patients and survivors across four English-speaking countries (i.e., Australia, Canada, the U.K., and the U.S.A.). Reach was assessed by the number of people who were shown the Ads, who clicked on the Ads, and completed study assessments. Demographic characteristics were gathered from Facebook Ads Manager and from online study assessments to describe who was reached. Costs were assessed by the budget spent and the cost per click for Ads, for reaching the study’s landing page, and for completing study assessments. To conduct a powered RCT, we needed 164 12-weeks assessments in both the intervention and the control group.
Results: From March till October 2018, we used 76 Ads, which were presented to 1.2 million people. 37.376 persons clicked on the study link in the Ads, resulting in 755 baseline completers. Most participants were female (92%), middle-aged (55.5 ± 9.79), and came from the U.K. (72%). The total Facebook advertisement costs from March till October 2018 were €17 k, resulting in an average cost of €0.45 per click on the Ads, €5.55 on average for a person reaching the study’s landing page, and €14.89 on average per eligible participant. The costs for every baseline and 12-weeks completer were €22.42 and €47.69, respectively.
Discussion: Reaching participants for international mHealth studies in psycho-oncology via Facebook Ads has potential but is costly. The key to reducing costs lies in constant optimization and testing of Ads and refinement of target audience characteristics.

PMID: 33489782 [PubMed]

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Recruiting participants for an international mHealth study via Facebook Ads: Experiences from the Untire App RCT






INTRODUCTION: Social media recruitment via Facebook Ads seems to be a promising method for large-scale international trials examining the effectiveness of mHealth interventions. However, little is known about this method in terms of strategy, reach, and costs in the context of psycho-oncology. This paper presents the results of the recruitment strategy that was applied in the Untire app study and shows how many participants could be reached using advertisements (i.e., Ads) on Facebook, who… Continue reading

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ICBT program for improving informal caregiver well-being: A qualitative study






CONCLUSIONS: Most of the informal caregivers were found to be satisfied with the program’s format and materials as well as the communication with the therapist via a message function in the program. Some suggestions were made regarding implementation of the live support option. Also, suggestions regarding possibility for tailoring the program’s content. Lastly, several personal and situational factors were identified as important in affecting informal caregiver well-being. We conclude that ICBT… Continue reading

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Moderators of the effect of psychosocial interventions on fatigue in women with breast cancer and men with prostate cancer: Individual patient data meta-analyses






CONCLUSIONS: Our findings did not provide evidence that any selected demographic or clinical characteristic, or baseline levels of fatigue or pain, moderated effects of psychosocial interventions on fatigue. A specific focus on decreasing fatigue seems beneficial for patients with breast cancer with clinically relevant fatigue. Continue reading

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Beating cancer-related fatigue with the Untire mobile app: Results from a waiting-list randomized controlled trial.






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Beating cancer-related fatigue with the Untire mobile app: Results from a waiting-list randomized controlled trial.

Psychooncology. 2020 Nov;29(11):1823-1834

Authors: Spahrkäs SS, Looijmans A, Sanderman R, Hagedoorn M

Abstract
OBJECTIVE: This waiting-list randomized controlled trial examined the effectiveness of a self-management mHealth app in improving fatigue and quality of life (QoL) in cancer patients and survivors.
METHODS: Persons with cancer-related fatigue (CRF) were recruited across four English speaking countries, via social media, and randomized into intervention (n = 519) and control (n = 280) groups. Whereas the intervention group received immediate access to the Untire app, the control group received access only after 12-weeks. Primary outcomes fatigue severity and interference, and secondary outcome QoL were assessed at baseline, 4, 8, and 12-weeks. We ran generalized linear mixed models for all outcomes to determine the effects of app access (yes/no), over 12-weeks, following the intention-to-treat principle.
RESULTS: Compared with the control group, the intervention group showed significantly larger improvements in fatigue severity (d = 0.40), fatigue interference (d = 0.35), and overall QoL on average (d = 0.32) (P’s < .01), but not for overall QoL in the past week (P = .07). Sensitivity analyses indicated that participants with medium or high app use benefited most when compared with nonusers and control participants (P’s ≤ .02). The intervention effect on fatigue interference was slightly stronger in younger participants (≤56 vs. >56). Effects did not depend on education and cancer status. Reliable change analyses indicated that significantly more people showed full recovery for fatigue in the intervention vs the control group (P’s = .02).
CONCLUSIONS: The Untire app can be an effective mHealth solution for cancer patients and survivors with moderate to severe CRF.

PMID: 33393199 [PubMed – in process]

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Beating cancer-related fatigue with the Untire mobile app: Results from a waiting-list randomized controlled trial






CONCLUSIONS: The Untire app can be an effective mHealth solution for cancer patients and survivors with moderate to severe CRF. Continue reading

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