Monthly Archives: November 2020

Smoking-Related Social Control in Indonesian Single-Smoker Couples.






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Smoking-Related Social Control in Indonesian Single-Smoker Couples.

Int J Behav Med. 2020 Nov 10;:

Authors: Ayuningtyas DA, Tuinman M, Prabandari YS, Hagedoorn M

Abstract
BACKGROUND: The majority of Indonesian smokers are men and those who are married nearly always have a non-smoking wife (i.e. single-smoker couples). Previous studies have suggested that Indonesian women dislike smoking. However, contesting their husbands’ smoking could be seen as disrespectful. In this study, we examine whether, and if so how, wives employ social control tactics to change their husbands’ smoking and how the smokers perceive the tactics.
METHOD: In-depth interviews (N = 12) with five single-smoker couples (N = 10 individual interviews) and two non-smoking wives of smokers (N = 2) were conducted in Jogjakarta, Indonesia. We used a social control framework and thematic analysis approach to analyse the transcribed interviews.
RESULTS: Three themes emerged from smokers and their wives: (1) although the wives know that smoking is bad, they have to tolerate it, (2) wives and their husbands find it important to maintain harmony and (3) their family’s needs serve as common ground. All the wives interviewed exerted social control to some degree, especially when they were pregnant or had children. Smokers reacted positively to social control and agreed to child-related house rules, but not to requests to give up smoking.
CONCLUSION: Wives do exert social control and smokers are willing to accommodate and adapt their smoking. However, wives’ influence on smoking may be limited in Indonesia, and focusing on managing their husbands’ smoking at home rather than overall smoking might be more fruitful.

PMID: 33170469 [PubMed – as supplied by publisher]

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Interpretations of partners’ responses to pain behaviours: Perspectives of patients and partners.






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Interpretations of partners’ responses to pain behaviours: Perspectives of patients and partners.

Br J Health Psychol. 2020 Nov 12;:

Authors: Akbari F, Mohammadi S, Dehghani M, Sanderman R, Hagedoorn M

Abstract
OBJECTIVES: Partner’s responses to pain behaviours play a pivotal role in the patient’s adjustment. This study aims to further our knowledge regarding patients’ and partners’ interpretation of partners’ responses to pain behaviours, and the possible discrepancies between patients’ and partners’ perceptions. Further, this study examines patients’ preferred responses to pain behaviours and possible discrepancies between received and preferred responses to pain behaviours.
DESIGN: A qualitative research design based on a semi-structured in-depth interview.
METHODS: Patients with chronic low back pain and their partners (n = 54) were recruited through purposive sampling and interviewed. Data were analysed based on an inductive analytic approach.
RESULTS: Patients as well as partners indicated a number of different interpretations of partners’ responses to pain behaviours, including invalidation, relieving pain, validation, encouragement, caregiving exhaustion, and expressing resentment. Patients and partners revealed similarities in the interpretation of response categories that they associated with validation, invalidation, and expressing resentment. Discrepancies between patients and partners indicated that partners interpreted some responses as caused by caregiving exhaustion while patients did not. Patients perceived partner responses that included the active involvement of the partner (e.g., encouraging pain talk) more positively than responses that showed less active involvement of the partner.
CONCLUSION: Patients and partners are likely to make various interpretations of a certain partner response to pain behaviours. Our findings underscore that patients’ interpretation about a certain behaviour might determine whether that behaviour is rated as desirable or aversive.

PMID: 33180996 [PubMed – as supplied by publisher]

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Interpretations of partners’ responses to pain behaviours: Perspectives of patients and partners






CONCLUSION: Patients and partners are likely to make various interpretations of a certain partner response to pain behaviours. Our findings underscore that patients’ interpretation about a certain behaviour might determine whether that behaviour is rated as desirable or aversive. Continue reading

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Smoking-Related Social Control in Indonesian Single-Smoker Couples






CONCLUSION: Wives do exert social control and smokers are willing to accommodate and adapt their smoking. However, wives’ influence on smoking may be limited in Indonesia, and focusing on managing their husbands’ smoking at home rather than overall smoking might be more fruitful. Continue reading

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Psychological consequences of COVID-19 home confinement: The ECLB-COVID19 multicenter study






CONCLUSION: The ECLB-COVID19 survey revealed an increased psychosocial strain triggered by the home confinement. To mitigate this high risk of mental disorders and to foster an Active and Healthy Confinement Lifestyle (AHCL), a crisis-oriented interdisciplinary intervention is urgently needed. Continue reading

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Patients and Medical Staff Attitudes Toward the Future Inclusion of eHealth in Tuberculosis Management: Perspectives From Six Countries Evaluated using a Qualitative Framework






CONCLUSIONS: Within the 6 countries interviewed, there is high enthusiasm toward eHealth in TB. A potential app could first target information and communication gaps in TB, with additional modules aimed at setting-specific challenges. Continue reading

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