Monthly Archives: September 2018

Does Twitter language reliably predict heart disease? A commentary on Eichstaedt et al. (2015a)






We comment on Eichstaedt et al.’s (2015a) claim to have shown that language patterns among Twitter users, aggregated at the level of US counties, predicted county-level mortality rates from atherosclerotic heart disease (AHD), with “negative” language being associated with higher rates of death from AHD and “positive” language associated with lower rates. First, we examine some of Eichstaedt et al.’s apparent assumptions about the nature of AHD, as well as some issues related to the secondary… Continue reading

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Associations of daily partner responses with fatigue interference and relationship satisfaction in colorectal cancer patients






CONCLUSIONS: Daily partner responses appear to impact patients’ fatigue adjustment, especially on days patients experience high fatigue levels. Only facilitative responses toward well behavior seem to benefit both patients’ fatigue interference and relationship satisfaction. Couple interventions should guide partners to encourage patients’ well behavior and aid them to correctly estimate patients’ current fatigue severity. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2018 APA, all rights reserved). Continue reading

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Mindfulness-based stress reduction for menopausal symptoms after risk-reducing salpingo-oophorectomy (PURSUE study): a randomised controlled trial






CONCLUSION: Mindfulness-based stress reduction was effective at improving quality of life in the short- and long-term for patients with menopausal symptoms after RRSO; however, it was not associated with an improvement in sexual functioning or distress. Continue reading

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Explaining variability in therapist adherence and patient depressive symptom improvement: The role of therapist interpersonal skills and patient engagement






Understanding why therapists deviate from a treatment manual is crucial to interpret the mixed findings on the adherence-outcome association. The current study aims to examine whether therapists’ interpersonal behaviours and patients’ active engagement predict treatment outcome and therapist adherence in cognitive behaviour therapy (CBT) and mindfulness-based cognitive therapy (MBCT) for depressive symptoms. In addition, the study explores rater’s explanations for therapist nonadherence at… Continue reading

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