Monthly Archives: May 2015

Factors influencing work functioning after cancer diagnosis: a focus group study with cancer survivors and occupational health professionals.






Factors influencing work functioning after cancer diagnosis: a focus group study with cancer survivors and occupational health professionals.

Support Care Cancer. 2015 May 29;

Authors: Dorland HF, Abma FI, Roelen CA, Smink JG, Ranchor AV, Bültmann U

Abstract
PURPOSE: Cancer survivors (CSs) frequently return to work, but little is known about work functioning after return to work (RTW). We aimed to identify barriers and facilitators of work functioning among CSs.
METHODS: Three focus groups were conducted with CSs (n = 6, n = 8 and n = 8) and one focus group with occupational health professionals (n = 7). Concepts were identified by thematic analysis, using the Cancer and Work model as theoretical framework to structure the results.
RESULTS: Long-lasting symptoms (e.g. fatigue), poor adaptation, high work ethics, negative attitude to work, ambiguous communication, lack of support and changes in the work environment were mentioned as barriers of work functioning. In contrast, staying at work during treatment, open dialogue, high social support, appropriate work accommodations and high work autonomy facilitated work functioning.
CONCLUSIONS: Not only cancer-related symptoms affect work functioning of CSs after RTW but also psychosocial and work-related factors. The barriers and facilitators of work functioning should be further investigated in studies with a longitudinal design to examine work functioning over time.

PMID: 26022706 [PubMed – as supplied by publisher]

Continue reading

Posted in Support Care Cancer | Leave a comment

Mutual reinforcement between neuroticism and life experiences: a five-wave, 16-year study to test reciprocal causation.






Related Articles

Mutual reinforcement between neuroticism and life experiences: a five-wave, 16-year study to test reciprocal causation.

J Pers Soc Psychol. 2014 Oct;107(4):751-64

Authors: Jeronimus BF, Riese H, Sanderman R, Ormel J

Abstract
High neuroticism predicts psychopathology and physical health problems. Nongenetic factors, including major life events and experiences, explain approximately half of the variance in neuroticism. Conversely, neuroticism also predicts these life experiences. In this study, we aimed to quantify the reciprocal causation between neuroticism and life experiences and to gauge the magnitude and persistence of these associations. This longitudinal cohort study included 5 assessment waves over 16 years in a random sample of 296 Dutch participants (47% women) with a mean age of 34 years (SD = 12, range 16-63 years). Neuroticism was assessed with the Amsterdam Biographic Questionnaire. The experiences measured included positive and negative life events, long-term difficulties (LTDs), and change in life quality, all assessed by contextual rating procedures adapted from the Life Event and Difficulties Schedule. We fit structural equation models in Mplus. Results showed that neuroticism consistently predicted negative experiences, decreased life quality, and LTDs (β = 0.15 to 0.39), whereas effects on positive experiences were variable (β = 0.14). LTDs and deteriorated life quality each predicted small but persistent increases in neuroticism (β = 0.18), whereas improved life quality predicted small but persistent decreases (β = -0.13). This suggests set point change in neuroticism. Life event aggregates showed no persistent effects on the neuroticism set point. Neuroticism and life experiences showed persistent, bidirectional associations. Experience-driven changes in neuroticism lasted over a decade. Results support the corresponsive principle (reciprocal causation), suggesting a mixed model of change in neuroticism that distinguishes temporary changes in neuroticism from persistent changes in an individual’s neuroticism set point.

PMID: 25111305 [PubMed – indexed for MEDLINE]

Continue reading

Posted in J Pers Soc Psychol | Tagged | Leave a comment

Patients’ Outcome Expectations Matter in Psychological Interventions for Patients with Diabetes and Comorbid Depressive Symptoms.






Related Articles

Patients’ Outcome Expectations Matter in Psychological Interventions for Patients with Diabetes and Comorbid Depressive Symptoms.

Cognit Ther Res. 2015;39(3):307-317

Authors: Snippe E, Schroevers MJ, Annika Tovote K, Sanderman R, Emmelkamp PM, Fleer J

Abstract
This study examined whether patients’ expectations of treatment outcome predict treatment completion, homework compliance, and depressive symptom improvement in cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) and mindfulness-based cognitive therapy (MBCT). Study participants were patients with diabetes and comorbid depressive symptoms who were randomized to 8 sessions of either CBT (n = 45) or MBCT (n = 46), both individually delivered. The results showed that high outcome expectations were predictive of post-treatment depressive symptoms in CBT and MBCT, but not of early and mid-treatment symptoms. Patients’ outcome expectations predicted treatment completion in CBT and MBCT as well as homework compliance in MBCT. Homework compliance did not mediate the association between patients’ outcome expectations and post-treatment depressive symptom improvement. The findings do not support the hypothesis that patients’ expectations have an immediate impact on patients’ mental state and partially support the notion that patients are less involved in treatment when they hold low expectations for improvement.

PMID: 25983355 [PubMed – as supplied by publisher]

Continue reading

Posted in Cognit Ther Res | Tagged | Leave a comment

Shared decision making in transplantation: how patients see their role in the decision process of accepting a donor liver.






Related Articles
Shared decision making in transplantation: how patients see their role in the decision process of accepting a donor liver.
Liver Transpl. 2014 Sep;20(9):1072-80
Authors: Dries SO, Annema C, Berg AP, … Continue reading

Posted in Liver Transpl | Leave a comment

Body issues, sexual satisfaction, and relationship status satisfaction in long-term childhood cancer survivors and healthy controls.






Related Articles

Body issues, sexual satisfaction, and relationship status satisfaction in long-term childhood cancer survivors and healthy controls.

Psychooncology. 2015 May 8;

Authors: Lehmann V, Hagedoorn M, Gerhardt CA, Fults M, Olshefski RS, Sanderman R, Tuinman MA

Abstract
OBJECTIVE: Research on body image and sexual satisfaction after adult onset cancer has shown significant and lasting impairments regarding survivors’ sexuality and romantic relationships. However, knowledge about these topics and their associations in adult survivors of childhood cancer is largely lacking.
METHODS: Participants completed web-based questionnaires concerning body image, body dissociation, sexual satisfaction, and relationship status satisfaction (i.e., satisfaction with either being in a relationship or being single). Survivors (n = 87) and controls (n = 87) were matched on age and gender, with a mean age of 27 years (range: 20-40). Survivors were most often diagnosed with leukemia (46%), at an average of 16 years prior to study participation (range: 6-33 years).
RESULTS: Similar numbers of survivors and controls were single (n = 24/31), in a committed relationship (n = 33/23), or married (n = 30/33). Survivors and controls reported comparable levels of body image, body dissociation, sexual experiences, and sexual and status satisfaction (d = 0.15-0.28). Higher status satisfaction was associated with being in a relationship (compared with being single, β = 0.439), more positive body image (β = 0.196), and higher sexual satisfaction (β = 0.200).
CONCLUSIONS: Adult survivors of childhood cancer were comparable to healthy peers regarding views of their bodies and psychosexual development, which was unexpected. Independent of whether people experienced cancer or not, their status satisfaction was associated with their relationship status, body image, and sexual satisfaction. Future research should explore why sexual and body problems are identified after adult onset cancer, whereas this seems to be less of a problem in childhood cancer survivors. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

PMID: 25959111 [PubMed – as supplied by publisher]

Continue reading

Posted in Psychooncology | Tagged | Leave a comment

The impact of age on changes in quality of life among breast cancer survivors treated with breast-conserving surgery and radiotherapy.






Related Articles

The impact of age on changes in quality of life among breast cancer survivors treated with breast-conserving surgery and radiotherapy.

Br J Cancer. 2015 Feb 17;112(4):636-43

Authors: Bantema-Joppe EJ, de Bock GH, Woltman-van Iersel M, Busz DM, Ranchor AV, Langendijk JA, Maduro JH, van den Heuvel ER

Abstract
BACKGROUND: The purpose of the study was to determine the impact of young age on health-related quality of life (HRQoL) by comparing HRQoL of younger and older breast cancer patients, corrected for confounding, and of young patients and a general Dutch population.
METHODS: The population consisted of breast cancer survivors (stage 0-III) after breast-conserving surgery and radiotherapy. Health-related quality of life was prospectively assessed using the EORTC QLQ-C30 and QLQ-BR23 questionnaires. The association between age (⩽50; 51-70; ⩾70 years) and HRQoL over time was analysed with mixed modelling. The clinical relevance of differences between/within age groups was estimated with Cohen’s D and consensus-based guidelines. The HRQoL data from the young patient cohort were compared with Dutch reference data at 3 years after radiotherapy.
RESULTS: A total of 1420 patients completed 3200 questionnaires. Median follow-up was 34 (range 6-70) months. Median age was 59 (range 28-85) years. Compared with older subjects, young women reported worse HRQoL in the first year after radiotherapy, but clinical relevance was limited. Three years after radiotherapy, HRQoL values in the younger group were equal to those in the reference population. Pain and fatigue after radiotherapy improved, with medium clinical relevance.
CONCLUSIONS: Three years after radiotherapy for breast cancer, young age was not a risk factor for decreased HRQoL.

PMID: 25602967 [PubMed – indexed for MEDLINE]

Continue reading

Posted in Br J Cancer | Leave a comment

Individual mindfulness-based cognitive therapy and cognitive behavior therapy for treating depressive symptoms in patients with diabetes: results of a randomized controlled trial.






Related Articles

Individual mindfulness-based cognitive therapy and cognitive behavior therapy for treating depressive symptoms in patients with diabetes: results of a randomized controlled trial.

Diabetes Care. 2014 Sep;37(9):2427-34

Authors: Tovote KA, Fleer J, Snippe E, Peeters AC, Emmelkamp PM, Sanderman R, Links TP, Schroevers MJ

Abstract
OBJECTIVE: Depression is a common comorbidity of diabetes, undesirably affecting patients’ physical and mental functioning. Psychological interventions are effective treatments for depression in the general population as well as in patients with a chronic disease. The aim of this study was to assess the efficacy of individual mindfulness-based cognitive therapy (MBCT) and individual cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) in comparison with a waiting-list control condition for treating depressive symptoms in adults with type 1 or type 2 diabetes.
RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: In this randomized controlled trial, 94 outpatients with diabetes and comorbid depressive symptoms (i.e., Beck Depression Inventory-II [BDI-II] ≥14) were randomized to MBCT (n = 31), CBT (n = 32), or waiting list (n = 31). All participants completed written questionnaires and interviews at pre- and postmeasurement (3 months later). Primary outcome measure was severity of depressive symptoms (BDI-II and Toronto Hamilton Depression Rating Scale). Anxiety (Generalized Anxiety Disorder 7), well-being (Well-Being Index), diabetes-related distress (Problem Areas In Diabetes), and HbA1c levels were assessed as secondary outcomes.
RESULTS: Results showed that participants receiving MBCT and CBT reported significantly greater reductions in depressive symptoms compared with patients in the waiting-list control condition (respectively, P = 0.004 and P < 0.001; d = 0.80 and 1.00; clinically relevant improvement 26% and 29% vs. 4%). Both interventions also had significant positive effects on anxiety, well-being, and diabetes-related distress. No significant effect was found on HbA1c values.
CONCLUSIONS: Both individual MBCT and CBT are effective in improving a range of psychological symptoms in individuals with type 1 and type 2 diabetes.

PMID: 24898301 [PubMed – indexed for MEDLINE]

Continue reading

Posted in Diabetes Care | Tagged | Leave a comment