Monthly Archives: January 2013

Managed problem solving for antiretroviral therapy adherence: a randomized trial






CONCLUSIONS: Managed Problem Solving is an effective antiretroviral adherence intervention over the first year with a new regimen. It was equally effective at improving adherence in treatment experienced and naïve patients and did not lose effect over time. Implementation of MAPS should be strongly considered where resources are available. Continue reading

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Triple P-Positive Parenting programs: the folly of basing social policy on underpowered flawed studies






Wilson et al. provided a valuable systematic and meta-analytic review of the Triple P-Positive Parenting program in which they identified substantial problems in the quality of available evidence. Their review largely escaped unscathed after Sanders et al.’s critical commentary. However, both of these sources overlook the most serious problem with the Triple P literature, namely, the over-reliance on positive but substantially underpowered trials. Such trials are particularly susceptible to… Continue reading

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Does evidence support the American Heart Association’s recommendation to screen patients for depression in cardiovascular care? An updated systematic review






CONCLUSIONS: There is evidence that treatment of depression results in modest improvement in depressive symptoms in post-MI and stable CHD patients, although not in HF patients. There is still no evidence that routine screening for depression improves depression or cardiac outcomes. The AHA Science Advisory on depression screening should be revised to reflect this lack of evidence. Continue reading

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