Category Archives: J Cancer Surviv

Depressive symptom trajectories in women affected by breast cancer and their male partners: a nationwide prospective cohort study.






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Depressive symptom trajectories in women affected by breast cancer and their male partners: a nationwide prospective cohort study.

J Cancer Surviv. 2016 Apr 15;

Authors: Rottmann N, Hansen DG, Hagedoorn M, Larsen PV, Nicolaisen A, Bidstrup PE, Würtzen H, Flyger H, Kroman N, Johansen C

Abstract
PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to identify subgroups of breast cancer patients and their partners based on distinct trajectories of depressive symptoms, to examine how relationship quality and medical and sociodemographic factors were associated with these trajectories, and to explore whether patients and partners had similar trajectories.
METHODS: A nationwide, population-based cohort of couples dealing with breast cancer was established in Denmark. Participants completed the Center for Epidemiologic Studies-Depression Scale at baseline and 5 and 12 months later. Sociodemographic and medical characteristics were retrieved from registers. A trajectory finite mixture model was used to identify trajectories.
RESULTS: The trajectories of depressive symptoms over time were analyzed in 546 patients and 508 partners. Among patients, 13 % had a high stable trajectory, 38 % an intermediate decreasing trajectory, and 49 % a low trajectory. Similar trajectories were found for partners (11, 22, and 67 %, respectively). Compared to the low trajectory, trajectories with higher depressive symptoms were associated with poorer relationship quality and previous use of antidepressants for patients and partners and with younger age, comorbidity, basic education, and chemotherapy for patients. The trajectories of patients and their partners were weakly correlated.
CONCLUSIONS: A considerable minority of patients and partners had a persistently high level of depressive symptoms. Poorer relationship quality and previous antidepressant use most consistently characterized patients and partners with higher depressive symptom trajectories.
IMPLICATIONS FOR CANCER SURVIVORS: In clinical practice, attention to differences in depressive symptom trajectories is important to identify and target patients and partners who might need support.

PMID: 27084710 [PubMed – as supplied by publisher]

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The Cognitive Symptom Checklist-Work in cancer patients is related with work functioning, fatigue and depressive symptoms: a validation study.






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The Cognitive Symptom Checklist-Work in cancer patients is related with work functioning, fatigue and depressive symptoms: a validation study.

J Cancer Surviv. 2015 Nov 30;

Authors: Dorland HF, Abma FI, Roelen CA, Smink A, Feuerstein M, Amick BC, Ranchor AV, Bültmann U

Abstract
PURPOSE: The study objectives are to translate the 21-item Cognitive Symptom Checklist-Work (CSC-W21) to Dutch (CSC-W DV) and to validate the CSC-W DV in working cancer patients.
METHODS: The CSC-W21 was cross-culturally translated and adapted to a Dutch version. In this 19-item version, the dichotomous response option was changed to an ordinal five-point scale. A validation study of the CSC-W DV was conducted among cancer patients who had returned to work during or following cancer treatment. Internal consistency (Cronbach’s α), structural validity (exploratory factor analysis) and construct validity (hypothesis testing) were evaluated.
RESULTS: In a cohort of 364 cancer patients, 341 (94 %) completed the CSC-W DV (aged 50.6 ± 8.6 years, 60 % women). Exploratory factor analysis revealed two subscales ‘working memory’ and ‘executive function’. The internal consistency of the total scale and subscales was high (Cronbach’s α = 0.93-0.95). Hypothesis testing showed that self-reported cognitive limitations at work were related to work functioning (P < 0.001), fatigue (P = 0.001) and depressive symptoms (P < 0.001), but not to self-rated health (P = 0.14).
CONCLUSIONS: The CSC-W DV showed high internal consistency and reasonable construct validity for measuring work-specific cognitive symptoms in cancer patients. The CSC-W DV was associated in expected ways with work functioning, fatigue and depressive symptoms.
IMPLICATIONS FOR CANCER SURVIVORS: It is important to enhance knowledge about cognitive symptoms at work in cancer patients, to guide and support cancer patients as good as possible when they are back at work and to improve their work functioning over time.

PMID: 26620817 [PubMed – as supplied by publisher]

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Body image in cancer survivors: a systematic review of case-control studies.






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Body image in cancer survivors: a systematic review of case-control studies.

J Cancer Surviv. 2014 Dec 2;

Authors: Lehmann V, Hagedoorn M, Tuinman MA

Abstract
PURPOSE: There is common consensus that cancer and its treatment can impair the body, but combined evidence of the previous literature in cancer survivors is missing. Therefore, we reviewed body image in cancer survivors and focused on case-control studies, in order to draw conclusions as to whether body image might be altered due to cancer.
METHODS: Medline, Cinahl, Embase, and PsycInfo were searched and after duplicate extraction, 1932 hits were retrieved and screened for eligibility. Included studies were rated on selection, measurement, and reporting bias.
RESULTS: Twenty-five studies were identified using 19 different scales to measure body image. Ten studies reported a more negative body image in survivors, nine found no differences, three reported mixed findings, and three reported a more positive body image in survivors. Potential bias was common and 16 studies had at least three sources of potential bias. Less-biased studies (i.e., ≤2 sources of bias) hinted to weak differences between survivors and controls, favoring healthy controls. A meta-analysis could not be performed.
CONCLUSIONS: This review was long overdue and indicates a somewhat more negative body image in cancer survivors than healthy controls. However, numerous problems potentially biasing study results have been detected and firm conclusions cannot be drawn.
IMPLICATIONS FOR CANCER SURVIVORS: Future studies should recruit larger samples, match samples, and pay attention to how body image is conceptualized and measured in order to draw reliable conclusions as to whether body image is impaired in cancer survivors.

PMID: 25446910 [PubMed – as supplied by publisher]

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