Category Archives: Health Qual Life Outcomes

Testing the McSad depression specific classification system in patients with somatic conditions: validity and performance.






Related Articles
Testing the McSad depression specific classification system in patients with somatic conditions: validity and performance.
Health Qual Life Outcomes. 2013;11:125
Authors: Papageorgiou K, Vermeulen K… Continue reading

Posted in Health Qual Life Outcomes | Tagged | Leave a comment

Validation of the self-management ability scale (SMAS) and development and validation of a shorter scale (SMAS-S) among older patients shortly after hospitalisation.






Related Articles

Validation of the self-management ability scale (SMAS) and development and validation of a shorter scale (SMAS-S) among older patients shortly after hospitalisation.

Health Qual Life Outcomes. 2012;10:9

Authors: Cramm JM, Strating MM, de Vreede PL, Steverink N, Nieboer AP

Abstract
BACKGROUND: The 30-item Self-Management Ability Scale (SMAS) measures self-management abilities (SMA). Objectives of this study were to (1) validate the SMAS among older people shortly after hospitalisation and (2) shorten the SMAS while maintaining adequate validity and reliability.
METHODS: Our study was conducted among older individuals (≥ 65) who had recently been discharged from a hospital. Three months after hospital admission, 296/456 patients (65% response) were interviewed in their homes. We tested the instrument by means of structural equation modelling, and examined its validity and reliability. In addition, we tested internal consistency of the SMAS and SMAS-S among a study sample of patients at risk for cardiovascular diseases.
RESULTS: After eliminating 12 items, the confirmatory factor analyses revealed good indices of fit with the resulting 18-item SMAS (SMAS-S). To estimate construct validity of the instrument, we looked at correlations between SMAS subscale scores and overall well-being scores as measured by Social Product Function (SPF-IL) and Cantril’s ladder. All SMAS subscales of the original and short version significantly correlated with SPF-IL scores (all at p ≤ 0.001) and Cantril’s ladder (for the cognitive well-being subscale p ≤ 0.01; all other subscales at p ≤ 0.001). The findings indicated validity. Analyses of the SMAS and SMAS-S in the sample of patients at risk for cardiovascular diseases showed that both instruments are reliable.
CONCLUSIONS: The psychometric properties of both the SMAS and SMAS-S are good. The SMAS-S is a promising alternate instrument to evaluate self-management abilities.

PMID: 22273404 [PubMed – indexed for MEDLINE]

Continue reading

Posted in Health Qual Life Outcomes | Tagged | Leave a comment

Effect of adaptive abilities on utilities, direct or mediated by mental health?






Related Articles

Effect of adaptive abilities on utilities, direct or mediated by mental health?

Health Qual Life Outcomes. 2010;8:130

Authors: Peeters Y, Ranchor AV, Vliet Vlieland TP, Stiggelbout AM

Abstract
BACKGROUND: In cost-utility analyses gain in health can be measured using health state utilities. Health state utilities can be elicited from members of the public or from patients. Utilities given by patients tend to be higher than utilities given by members of the public. This difference is often suggested to be explained by adaptation, but this has not yet been investigated in patients. Here, we investigate if, besides health related quality of life (HRQL), persons’ ability to adapt can explain health state utilities. Both the direct effect of persons’ adaptive abilities on health state utilities and the indirect effect, where HRQL mediates the effect of ability to adapt, are examined.
METHODS: In total 125 patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis were interviewed. Participants gave valuations of their own health on a visual analogue scale (VAS) and time trade-off (TTO). To estimate persons’ ability to adapt, patients filled in questionnaires measuring Self-esteem, Mastery, and Optimism. Finally they completed the SF-36 measuring HRQL. Regression analyses were used to investigate the direct and mediated effect of ability to adapt on health state utilities.
RESULTS: Persons’ ability to adapt did not add considerably to the explanation of health state utilities above HRQL. In the TTO no additional variance was explained by adaptive abilities (Δ R2 = .00, β = .02), in the VAS a minor proportion of the variance was explained by adaptive abilities (Δ R2 = .05, β = .33). The effect of adaptation on health state utilities seems to be mediated by the mental health domain of quality of life.
CONCLUSIONS: Patients with stronger adaptive abilities, based on their optimism, mastery and self-esteem, may more easily enhance their mental health after being diagnosed with a chronic illness, which leads to higher health state utilities.

PMID: 21073693 [PubMed – indexed for MEDLINE]

Continue reading

Posted in Health Qual Life Outcomes | Tagged | Leave a comment