Category Archives: Qual Life Res

Long-term effects of goal disturbance and adjustment on well-being in cancer patients.






Long-term effects of goal disturbance and adjustment on well-being in cancer patients.

Qual Life Res. 2015 Oct 7;

Authors: Janse M, Sprangers MA, Ranchor AV, Fleer J

Abstract
PURPOSE: To investigate the impact of personal goal disturbance after cancer diagnosis on well-being over time, and a possible moderating role of goal adjustment tendencies and actual goal adjustment strategies.
METHODS: Participants (n = 186) were interviewed three times: within a month, 7 months (treatment period), and 18 months (follow-up period) after being diagnosed with colorectal cancer. Participants were asked to freely mention three to ten personal goals. Goal disturbance was assessed by the patients’ ratings of the amount of hindrance experienced in goal achievement. Goal adjustment tendencies were assessed using the Goal Disengagement and Re-engagement Scale and actual goal adjustment (i.e. goal flexibility) by the number of goal adjustment strategies used. Outcome measures were overall quality of life and emotional functioning, assessed with the cancer-specific EORTC QLQ-C30.
RESULTS: Hierarchical regression analyses showed that goal disturbance predicted well-being over both the treatment and the follow-up period. Additionally, the negative effect of goal disturbance on well-being was less for patients who scored higher on goal disengagement and not significant for patients who were more flexible in their use of actual goal adjustment strategies.
CONCLUSIONS: The present study is the first to test the theoretical assumption that goal adjustment is beneficial after goal disturbance. Whereas these findings need to be confirmed in future research, the possibly beneficial role of goal disengagement and actual goal adjustment strategies can be used for psychological interventions.

PMID: 26446093 [PubMed – as supplied by publisher]

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Do individuals with and without depression value depression differently? And if so, why?






Do individuals with and without depression value depression differently? And if so, why?

Qual Life Res. 2015 Jun 3;

Authors: Papageorgiou K, Vermeulen KM, Schroevers MJ, Stiggelbout AM, Buskens E, Krabbe PF, van den Heuvel E, Ranchor AV

Abstract
PURPOSE: Health state valuations, used to evaluate the effectiveness of healthcare interventions, can be obtained either by the patients or by the general population. The general population seems to value somatic conditions more negatively than patients, but little is known about valuations of psychological conditions. This study examined whether individuals with and without depression differ in their valuations of depression and whether perceptions regarding depression (empathy, perceived susceptibility, stigma, illness perceptions) and individual characteristics (mastery, self-compassion, dysfunctional attitudes) bias valuations of either individuals with or without depression.
METHODS: In an online study, a general population sample used a time-trade-off task to value 30 vignettes describing depression states (four per participant) and completed questionnaires on perceptions regarding depression and individual characteristics. Participants were assigned to depression groups (with or without depression), based on the PHQ-9. A generalized linear mixed model was used to assess discrepancies in valuations and identify their determinants.
RESULTS: The sample (N = 1268) was representative of the Dutch population on age, gender, education and residence. We found that for mild depression states, individuals with depression (N = 200) valued depression more negatively than individuals without depression (N = 1068) (p = .007). Variables related to perceptions of depression and individual characteristics were not found to affect valuations of either individuals with or individuals without depression.
CONCLUSION: Since the general population values depression less negatively, using their perspective might result in less effectiveness for interventions for mild depression. Perceptions of depression or to individual characteristics did not seem to differentially affect valuations made by either individuals with or without depression.

PMID: 26038219 [PubMed – as supplied by publisher]

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The mediating role of disability and social support in the association between low vision and depressive symptoms in older adults.






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The mediating role of disability and social support in the association between low vision and depressive symptoms in older adults.

Qual Life Res. 2014 Apr;23(3):1039-43

Authors: Kempen GI, Ranchor AV, Ambergen T, Zijlstra GA

Abstract
PURPOSE: Vision loss is highly prevalent in old age and has a substantial impact on different aspects of quality of life including depressive symptoms. Our objective was to examine the mediating role of disability and social support in the association between low vision and depressive symptoms.
METHODS: Differences in disability, social support, and depressive symptoms between 148 persons with low vision and a reference population (N = 4,792) all ≥57 years were compared. The association between low vision and depressive symptoms and the mediating role of disability and social support was examined by the means of regression.
RESULTS: A significant effect of low vision on depressive symptoms was identified even after the adjustment for disability and social support (standardized beta 0.053, P < 0.001). The association between low vision and symptoms of depression was partially mediated by disability, while social support was identified as a suppressor variable. Low vision, disability, and social support showed unique contributions to depressive symptoms.
CONCLUSIONS: Prevention of disability and the increase in social support may help to reduce symptoms of depression in older adults with low vision. By taking such information into account in their intervention work, health professionals working in this area may improve their care quality.

PMID: 24081872 [PubMed – indexed for MEDLINE]

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The role of meaning in the prediction of psychosocial well-being of testicular cancer survivors.






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The role of meaning in the prediction of psychosocial well-being of testicular cancer survivors.
Qual Life Res. 2006 May;15(4):705-17
Authors: Fleer J, Hoekstra HJ, Sleijfer DT, Tuinman MA, Hoekstra-Weebers JE… Continue reading

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Finding a useful conceptual basis for enhancing the quality of life of nursing home residents.






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Finding a useful conceptual basis for enhancing the quality of life of nursing home residents.
Qual Life Res. 2004 Apr;13(3):611-24
Authors: Gerritsen DL, Steverink N, Ooms ME, Ribbe MW
Abstract
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How to measure self-management abilities in older people by self-report. The development of the SMAS-30.






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How to measure self-management abilities in older people by self-report. The development of the SMAS-30.
Qual Life Res. 2005 Dec;14(10):2215-28
Authors: Schuurmans H, Steverink N, Frieswijk N, Buunk BP, Slaets… Continue reading

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Measurement of overall quality of life in nursing homes through self-report: the role of cognitive impairment.






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Measurement of overall quality of life in nursing homes through self-report: the role of cognitive impairment.
Qual Life Res. 2007 Aug;16(6):1029-37
Authors: Gerritsen DL, Steverink N, Ooms ME, de Vet HC, Rib… Continue reading

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A comparison of two multidimensional measures of health status: the Nottingham Health Profile and the RAND 36-Item Health Survey 1.0.






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A comparison of two multidimensional measures of health status: the Nottingham Health Profile and the RAND 36-Item Health Survey 1.0.
Qual Life Res. 1996 Feb;5(1):165-74
Authors: VanderZee KI, Sanderman R, Heyi… Continue reading

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Measuring health status with the Dartmouth COOP charts in low-functioning elderly. Do the illustrations affect the outcomes?






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Measuring health status with the Dartmouth COOP charts in low-functioning elderly. Do the illustrations affect the outcomes?
Qual Life Res. 1997 May;6(4):323-8
Authors: Kempen GI, van Sonderen E, Sanderman R
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Functional decline after congestive heart failure and acute myocardial infarction and the impact of psychological attributes. A prospective study.






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Functional decline after congestive heart failure and acute myocardial infarction and the impact of psychological attributes. A prospective study.
Qual Life Res. 2000;9(4):439-50
Authors: Kempen GI, Sanderman R… Continue reading

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