Category Archives: Psychooncology

Psychological burden at the time of diagnosis among Mexican breast cancer patients.






Related Articles

Psychological burden at the time of diagnosis among Mexican breast cancer patients.

Psychooncology. 2016 Feb 12;

Authors: Pérez-Fortis A, Schroevers MJ, Fleer J, Alanís-López P, Veloz-Martínez MG, Ornelas-Mejorada RE, Sanderman R, Ranchor AV, Sánchez Sosa JJ

PMID: 26872293 [PubMed – as supplied by publisher]

Continue reading

Posted in Psychooncology | Tagged | Leave a comment

Trajectories of personal control in cancer patients receiving psychological care.






Related Articles
Trajectories of personal control in cancer patients receiving psychological care.
Psychooncology. 2015 May;24(5):556-63
Authors: Zhu L, Schroevers MJ, van der Lee M, Garssen B, Stewart RE, Sanderman … Continue reading

Posted in Psychooncology | Leave a comment

Which goal adjustment strategies do cancer patients use? A longitudinal study.






Which goal adjustment strategies do cancer patients use? A longitudinal study.

Psychooncology. 2015 Aug 26;

Authors: Janse M, Fleer J, Smink A, Sprangers MA, Ranchor AV

Abstract
OBJECTIVE: A cancer diagnosis may lead to the need to adjust personal goals. This study longitudinally investigates patients’ use of goal adjustment strategies with goal characteristics over time. Whether and which goal adjustment strategies are used after cancer diagnosis may depend on the period studied (treatment period or follow-up period) and illness variables such as illness severity.
METHODS: Newly diagnosed colorectal cancer patients (n = 186) were asked about their personal goals during three assessments (within 1 month after diagnosis and 6 and 18 months after the first assessment). Eight goal adjustment strategies were assessed over the first 6 months (treatment period) and between 7 and 18 months (follow-up period) using goal characteristics. Illness variables were obtained from patients’ medical records from the national cancer registry.
RESULTS: Most patients used one strategy per period, and patients most often shifted their priorities across life domains. During the treatment period, more patients formed shorter-term goals than during the follow-up period, while during the follow-up period, more patients formed longer-term goals than during the treatment period. Illness variables were not related to the use of goal adjustment strategies.
CONCLUSIONS: The findings show that cancer patients use different goal adjustment strategies and, interestingly, that the use of specific strategies depended on the period after diagnosis but not on illness variables. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

PMID: 26308665 [PubMed – as supplied by publisher]

Continue reading

Posted in Psychooncology | Leave a comment

Providing care to a child with cancer: a longitudinal study on the course, predictors, and impact of caregiving stress during the first year after diagnosis.






Related Articles

Providing care to a child with cancer: a longitudinal study on the course, predictors, and impact of caregiving stress during the first year after diagnosis.

Psychooncology. 2015 Mar;24(3):318-24

Authors: Sulkers E, Tissing WJ, Brinksma A, Roodbol PF, Kamps WA, Stewart RE, Sanderman R, Fleer J

Abstract
OBJECTIVE: This study investigated the course, predictors, and impact of caregiving stress on the functioning of primary caregivers of children with cancer during the first year after a child’s cancer diagnosis.
METHODS: Primary caregivers (N = 95, 100% mother, 86% response rate) of consecutive newly diagnosed paediatric cancer patients (0-18 years) completed measures of caregiving stress, depressive symptoms, anxiety, and self-reported health at diagnosis, and 3, 6, and 12 months thereafter.
RESULTS: Results indicated a significant decrease in caregiving stress (especially during the first 3 months after diagnosis). Caregiving stress was predicted by single marital status and the ill child being the mother’s only child. Multilevel analyses, controlled for socio-demographic and medical covariates, showed that, over time, the decline in caregiving stress was accompanied by a reduction in depressive symptoms and anxiety. The amount of variance explained by caregiving stress was 53% for depressive symptoms, 47% for anxiety, and 3% for self-reported health.
CONCLUSIONS: The present study suggests that caregiving stress is an important factor in understanding parental adjustment to childhood cancer. This offers possibilities for developing interventions aimed at preventing caregiving stress, and strengthening mothers’ confidence in their ability to provide good care. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

PMID: 25113320 [PubMed – indexed for MEDLINE]

Continue reading

Posted in Psychooncology | Tagged | Leave a comment

Fatigue screening in breast cancer patients: identifying likely cases of cancer-related fatigue.






Related Articles

Fatigue screening in breast cancer patients: identifying likely cases of cancer-related fatigue.

Psychooncology. 2015 Jul 22;

Authors: Goedendorp MM, Jacobsen PB, Andrykowski MA

Abstract
OBJECTIVE: For clinical and research purposes, efficient identification of cases of cancer-related fatigue (CRF) is important, as CRF can be persistent and interfere with usual functioning. While various fatigue-screening instruments are available, no brief screening indices have been developed using formally diagnosed CRF cases as the criterion.
METHODS: Breast cancer patients (n = 385) completed a fatigue diagnostic interview and self-report fatigue measures (Profile of Mood States-fatigue subscale, Fatigue Symptom Inventory, and SF-36 vitality subscale), after initial adjuvant therapy (post-treatment (post-Tx) 1 assessment), after completion of radiotherapy for women receiving chemotherapy + radiotherapy (post-Tx 2 assessment), and 6 months after completion of all adjuvant therapy (6-month post-Tx assessment). CRF cases were identified using specific diagnostic criteria. ROC analyses identified screening indices, which could accurately identify CRF cases after initial adjuvant therapy. Screening indices were cross-validated using post-Tx 2 and 6-month follow-up assessment data.
RESULTS: A total of 104 women (27%) met CRF criteria after initial adjuvant therapy. Six two-item screening indices were identified. For all indices, area under the curve exceeded 0.80, sensitivity exceeded 0.80, and specificity exceeded 0.57. Cross-validation suggested that, except for the index based on SF-36, all the indices continued to accurately identify CRF cases at the post-Tx 2 and 6-month post-Tx assessments. Overall, a two-item composite index based on Fatigue Symptom Inventory ‘most severity’ and ‘work interference’ items performed best.
CONCLUSIONS: Breast cancer patients and survivors meeting CRF diagnostic criteria can be accurately identified using brief screening indices derived from common self-report fatigue measures. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

PMID: 26202003 [PubMed – as supplied by publisher]

Continue reading

Posted in Psychooncology | Tagged | Leave a comment

Body issues, sexual satisfaction, and relationship status satisfaction in long-term childhood cancer survivors and healthy controls.






Related Articles

Body issues, sexual satisfaction, and relationship status satisfaction in long-term childhood cancer survivors and healthy controls.

Psychooncology. 2015 May 8;

Authors: Lehmann V, Hagedoorn M, Gerhardt CA, Fults M, Olshefski RS, Sanderman R, Tuinman MA

Abstract
OBJECTIVE: Research on body image and sexual satisfaction after adult onset cancer has shown significant and lasting impairments regarding survivors’ sexuality and romantic relationships. However, knowledge about these topics and their associations in adult survivors of childhood cancer is largely lacking.
METHODS: Participants completed web-based questionnaires concerning body image, body dissociation, sexual satisfaction, and relationship status satisfaction (i.e., satisfaction with either being in a relationship or being single). Survivors (n = 87) and controls (n = 87) were matched on age and gender, with a mean age of 27 years (range: 20-40). Survivors were most often diagnosed with leukemia (46%), at an average of 16 years prior to study participation (range: 6-33 years).
RESULTS: Similar numbers of survivors and controls were single (n = 24/31), in a committed relationship (n = 33/23), or married (n = 30/33). Survivors and controls reported comparable levels of body image, body dissociation, sexual experiences, and sexual and status satisfaction (d = 0.15-0.28). Higher status satisfaction was associated with being in a relationship (compared with being single, β = 0.439), more positive body image (β = 0.196), and higher sexual satisfaction (β = 0.200).
CONCLUSIONS: Adult survivors of childhood cancer were comparable to healthy peers regarding views of their bodies and psychosexual development, which was unexpected. Independent of whether people experienced cancer or not, their status satisfaction was associated with their relationship status, body image, and sexual satisfaction. Future research should explore why sexual and body problems are identified after adult onset cancer, whereas this seems to be less of a problem in childhood cancer survivors. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

PMID: 25959111 [PubMed – as supplied by publisher]

Continue reading

Posted in Psychooncology | Tagged | Leave a comment

Is implementing screening for distress an efficient means to recruit patients to a psychological intervention trial?






Related Articles
Is implementing screening for distress an efficient means to recruit patients to a psychological intervention trial?
Psychooncology. 2014 May;23(5):516-23
Authors: van Scheppingen C, Schroevers MJ, P… Continue reading

Posted in Psychooncology | Tagged | Leave a comment

Distress, problems and referral wish of cancer patients: differences according to relationship status and life phase.






Related Articles

Distress, problems and referral wish of cancer patients: differences according to relationship status and life phase.

Psychooncology. 2014 Oct 24;

Authors: Tuinman MA, Van Nuenen FM, Hagedoorn M, Hoekstra-Weebers JE

Abstract
OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study is to examine differences in distress, problems and referral wish in cancer patients according to relationship status and life phase.
METHODS: A cross-sectional group of 1340 patients (response = 51%) completed socio-demographic and illness-related questions, and the Dutch version of the Distress Thermometer and Problem List that also assesses desire for additional care (yes, maybe and no). Relationship status was categorized into six groups (married, cohabiting, LAT (=living-apart-together: have a partner but live alone), divorced, widowed or single) and age into young (18-50), middle aged (51-65) and older (65+) cohorts.
RESULTS: Relationship status and life phase were independently related to high distress, referral wish and accordance between the latter two. Single and LAT patients were around two times more likely than married patients to be highly distressed, and wanting additional care. The same was found for younger patients as compared to 65+ patients. Whereas high distress is usually not a strong indication for additional care needs, single, LAT and younger patients most often wanted care when they were highly distressed.
CONCLUSION: Health care professionals who implement distress screening in practice can expect a higher need for additional care in single and LAT patients, but only when they are younger or middle aged. The benefit of having a partner around on a daily basis seems less important in dealing with cancer-related problems when patients are older. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

PMID: 25345693 [PubMed – as supplied by publisher]

Continue reading

Posted in Psychooncology | Tagged | Leave a comment

Negative and positive consequences of adolescent cancer 10 years after diagnosis: an interview-based longitudinal study in Sweden.






Negative and positive consequences of adolescent cancer 10 years after diagnosis: an interview-based longitudinal study in Sweden.

Psychooncology. 2014 Apr 15;

Authors: Lehmann V, Grönqvist H, Engvall G, Ander M, Tuinman MA, Hagedoorn M, Sanderman R, Mattsson E, von Essen L

Abstract
OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to provide insight into survivor-reported negative and positive consequences of cancer during adolescence 10 years after diagnosis and compare these with consequences reported 3 and 4 years after diagnosis.
METHODS: Three, 4, and 10 years after diagnosis, survivors of adolescent cancer were interviewed about negative and positive consequences due to their cancer experience. Manifest content analysis was used to identify categories of reported consequences. Categories of consequences 10 years after diagnosis were compared with consequences reported 3 and 4 years after diagnosis.
RESULTS: Seven categories of negative consequences were identified: bodily concerns, existential thoughts about loss and life (new at 10 years), psychological problems, difficulties interacting with others, health worries (new), fertility concerns (new), and frustrations about health care (new); and six categories of positive consequences: positive view of life, positive view of self, compassion for others (new), close relationships, gained knowledge about disease and health care, and financial gains. Consistent with previous time points, bodily concerns were reported most often. The majority of survivors (n = 22) reported both negative and positive consequences of their former disease. Few reported only negative (n = 2) or only positive consequences (n = 4).
CONCLUSIONS: Ten years after diagnosis, most survivors reported both negative and positive consequences. New themes, relevant to young adulthood and long-term survival, were identified. Health care professionals treating young adult survivors may anticipate and address problems regarding physical health, fertility, and health care but may also reinforce positive affect by addressing survivors’ positive views of life, sense of self, and close relationships. © 2014 The Authors. Psycho-Oncology published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

PMID: 24737637 [PubMed – as supplied by publisher]

Continue reading

Posted in Psychooncology | Tagged | Leave a comment

Exploring the contribution of psychosocial factors to fatigue in patients with advanced incurable cancer.






Exploring the contribution of psychosocial factors to fatigue in patients with advanced incurable cancer.

Psychooncology. 2014 Jan 24;

Authors: Peters ME, Goedendorp MM, Verhagen SA, van der Graaf WT, Bleijenberg G

Abstract
OBJECTIVE: Fatigue is the most frequently occurring and distressing symptom in patients with advanced cancer, caused by multiple factors. Neither a specific histological diagnosis of malignancy nor the type of anticancer treatment seem to be strongly related to fatigue, which support the idea that other factors may play a role. This study investigated to what extent the model of fatigue-perpetuating factors that is known for cancer survivors was applicable for patients with advanced cancer.
METHODS: Patients on active treatment for various incurable cancers were asked to complete the Checklist Individual Strength, subscale fatigue severity and physical activity, the Acceptance scale of the Illness Cognition Questionnaire, the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, the Fatigue Catastrophizing Scale, the Symptom Checklist subscale sleep, and the van Sonderen Social Support List-Discrepancies.
RESULTS: The questionnaires were filled in by 137 patients. Inappropriate coping, fear of progression, fatigue catastrophizing, discrepancies in social support, depressive mood, self reported physical activity, and sleeping problems were all related to fatigue severity in univariate analyses, of which the latter two were significant in a multivariate linear regression analysis.
CONCLUSION: This study tested fatigue-perpetuating factors known to be of relevance in cancer survivors, for their relation with fatigue severity in palliative patients. We demonstrated that these factors were also relevant for patients on palliative treatment. On the basis of our results, we suggest clinicians confronted with palliative patients with serious fatigue to address sleeping problems and promote physical activity. In case of persistent fatigue, personalized cognitive behavioral therapy can be considered. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

PMID: 24458595 [PubMed – as supplied by publisher]

Continue reading

Posted in Psychooncology | Tagged | Leave a comment