A dyadic planning intervention to quit smoking in single-smoking couples: design of a randomized controlled trial.

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A dyadic planning intervention to quit smoking in single-smoking couples: design of a randomized controlled trial.

BMC Psychol. 2018 Nov 12;6(1):53

Authors: Buitenhuis AH, Tuinman MA, Hagedoorn M

Abstract
BACKGROUND: Tobacco use is the largest preventable cause of death. Smoking cessation interventions that use implementation intentions show promising results. Implementation intentions are if-then plans that specify a certain behaviour within a situational context. This study will examine whether involving a non-smoking partner could improve planning interventions, and whether and which partner interactions underlie this effectiveness.
METHODS: This single-blind randomized controlled trial has a longitudinal design with a baseline questionnaire, end-of-day measurements for three weeks starting on the quit date, and a follow-up questionnaire after three months.
PARTICIPANTS: single-smoking couples who live together and are in a relationship for more than one year.
SETTING: couples are randomized to either a dyadic or individual planning condition. After the intervention the smoker attempts to quit smoking and the diary measurements start.
MEASUREMENTS: The primary outcome variable is smoking abstinence. Secondary outcome measures are smoking behaviour and relationship satisfaction. Partner interactions are examined as a possible mediator.
DISCUSSION: This RCT is the first to examine the effectiveness of dyadic planning to quit smoking in single-smoking couples. Partner interactions are thought to play an important role during the quit attempt, and therefore in the effectiveness of the intervention. This RCT will provide more insight into which daily partner interactions are beneficial for smoking abstinence and the couples’ relationship satisfaction, and whether the type of intervention is related to different types or levels of partner interactions and smoking behaviour. When proven effective, this planning intervention in combination with coaching for the non-smoking partner will be a valuable and low-cost addition to existing smoking interventions.
TRIAL REGISTRATION: The trial is retrospectively registered on 19/04/2017 on www.trialregister.nl ( TC: 6398 ).

PMID: 30419956 [PubMed – in process]

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Determinants of participation in voluntary work: a systematic review and meta-analysis of longitudinal cohort studies.

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Determinants of participation in voluntary work: a systematic review and meta-analysis of longitudinal cohort studies.

BMC Public Health. 2018 Nov 02;18(1):1213

Authors: Niebuur J, van Lente L, Liefbroer AC, Steverink N, Smidt N

Abstract
BACKGROUND: Participation in voluntary work may be associated with individual and societal benefits. Because of these benefits and as a result of challenges faced by governments related to population ageing, voluntary work becomes more important for society, and policy measures are aimed at increasing participation rates. In order to effectively identify potential volunteers, insight in the determinants of volunteering is needed. Therefore, we conducted a systematic review including meta-analyses.
METHODS: A systematic search in MEDLINE, PsycINFO, SocINDEX, Business Source Premier, and EconLit was performed on August 12th 2015. We included longitudinal cohort studies conducted in developed countries that quantified factors associated with volunteering among samples from the general adult population. Two reviewers independently selected eligible studies, extracted the data and assessed the risk of bias of the included studies using the QUIPS tool. Estimates reported in the papers were transformed into Odds Ratios and 95% Confidence Intervals. For each determinant, random-effects meta-analyses were used to generate summary estimates.
RESULTS: We found that socioeconomic status, being married, social network size, church attendance and previous volunteer experiences are positively associated with volunteering. Age, functional limitations and transitions into parenthood were found to be inversely related to volunteering.
CONCLUSIONS: Important key factors have been identified as well as gaps in the current literature. Future research should be directed towards deepening the knowledge on the associations between the factors age, education, income, employment and participation in voluntary work. Moreover, major life course transitions should be studied in relation to volunteering.

PMID: 30384837 [PubMed – in process]

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Spousal Support for Patients With Rheumatoid Arthritis: Getting the Wrong Kind Is a Pain.

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Spousal Support for Patients With Rheumatoid Arthritis: Getting the Wrong Kind Is a Pain.

Front Psychol. 2018;9:1760

Authors: Pow J, Stephenson E, Hagedoorn M, DeLongis A

Abstract
Research indicates that perceived support availability is beneficial, with support available from the spouse particularly important for well-being. However, actual support mobilization has shown mixed associations with recipient well-being. The primary goal of the present study was to go beyond examining the effects of global perceptions of support on recipient outcomes. Instead, we examined the effects of several specific types of support that have been found to be important in the clinical literature. In this study, we followed both members of couples in which one partner was diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis. Patients provided reports on pain for both mornings and evenings across 1 week. Both partners also reported esteem, solicitous, and negative support mobilization received by the patient. We found that patient pain tended to increase across the day following increases in patient reports of negative support receipt and partner reports of solicitous support provision. We also found that patient pain tended to decrease across the day when partners reported increased levels of esteem support provision. Reverse causation analyses indicated higher levels of patient pain may lead partners to increase solicitous support mobilization to the patient. Findings underscore the importance of examining both partners’ reports of support within a dyadic coping framework. They further suggest that not all forms of support are equally beneficial, calling for a finer grained assessment of specific support transactions.

PMID: 30294292 [PubMed]

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Mindfulness-based stress reduction for menopausal symptoms after risk-reducing salpingo-oophorectomy (PURSUE study): a randomized controlled trial.

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Mindfulness-based stress reduction for menopausal symptoms after risk-reducing salpingo-oophorectomy (PURSUE study): a randomized controlled trial.

BJOG. 2018 Sep 17;:

Authors: van Driel CMG, de Bock GH, Schroevers MJ, Mourits MJ

Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To assess the short- and long-term effects of mindfulness-based stress reduction (MBSR) on the resulting quality of life, sexual functioning, and sexual distress after risk-reducing salpingo-oophorectomy (RRSO).
DESIGN: Randomized controlled trial.
SETTING: A specialized family cancer clinic of the university medical center Groningen.
POPULATION: 66 women carriers of the BRCA1/2 mutation who developed at least two moderate-to-severe menopausal symptoms after RRSO.
METHODS: Women were randomized to an 8 week MBSR training or care as usual (CAU).
MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Change in the Menopause-Specific Quality of Life Questionnaire (MENQOL), the Female Sexual Function Index, and the Female Sexual Distress Scale administered from baseline at 3, 6, and 12 months. Linear mixed modeling was applied to compare the effect of MBSR with CAU over time.
RESULTS: At 3 and 12 months there were statistically significant improvements in the MENQOL for the MBSR group compared with the CAU group (both p = 0.04). At 3 months, the mean MENQOL scores were 3.5 (95% confidence interval [95%CI], 3.0-3.9) and 3.8 (95%CI, 3.3-4.2) for the MBSR and CAU groups, respectively; at 12 months, the corresponding values were 3.6 (95%CI, 3.1-4.0) and 3.9 (95%CI, 3.5-4.4). No significant differences were found between the MBSR and CAU groups in the other scores.
CONCLUSIONS: MBSR was effective at improving quality of life in the short- and long-term for patients with menopausal symptoms after RRSO. However, it was not associated with improvement in sexual functioning or distress. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

PMID: 30222235 [PubMed – as supplied by publisher]

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Does Twitter language reliably predict heart disease? A commentary on Eichstaedt et al. (2015a).

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Does Twitter language reliably predict heart disease? A commentary on Eichstaedt et al. (2015a).

PeerJ. 2018;6:e5656

Authors: Brown NJL, Coyne JC

Abstract
We comment on Eichstaedt et al.’s (2015a) claim to have shown that language patterns among Twitter users, aggregated at the level of US counties, predicted county-level mortality rates from atherosclerotic heart disease (AHD), with “negative” language being associated with higher rates of death from AHD and “positive” language associated with lower rates. First, we examine some of Eichstaedt et al.’s apparent assumptions about the nature of AHD, as well as some issues related to the secondary analysis of online data and to considering counties as communities. Next, using the data files supplied by Eichstaedt et al., we reproduce their regression- and correlation-based models, substituting mortality from an alternative cause of death-namely, suicide-as the outcome variable, and observe that the purported associations between “negative” and “positive” language and mortality are reversed when suicide is used as the outcome variable. We identify numerous other conceptual and methodological limitations that call into question the robustness and generalizability of Eichstaedt et al.’s claims, even when these are based on the results of their ridge regression/machine learning model. We conclude that there is no good evidence that analyzing Twitter data in bulk in this way can add anything useful to our ability to understand geographical variation in AHD mortality rates.

PMID: 30258732 [PubMed]

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A Close Examination of the Relationship Between Self-Compassion and Depressive Symptoms.

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A Close Examination of the Relationship Between Self-Compassion and Depressive Symptoms.

Mindfulness (N Y). 2018;9(5):1470-1478

Authors: López A, Sanderman R, Schroevers MJ

Abstract
Self-compassion has shown to be beneficial for individuals’ wellbeing; in particular, it has been associated with lower levels of depressive symptoms. The purpose of this study was to further explore the association between self-compassion, as measured by the Self-Compassion Scale (SCS), and depressive symptoms, in a large representative sample of community adults (n = 734, Mean age = 55.7, SD = 15.2). We examined the association of depressive symptoms with the SCS total score, the SCS six subscales (i.e., self-kindness, common humanity, mindfulness, self-judgment, isolation, and over-identification), and the SCS positive and negative items (referred to as self-compassion and self-coldness, respectively). In addition, we explored the predictive ability of self-compassion, self-coldness, and the SCS six subscales on depressive symptoms both cross-sectionally and over a 1-year period of time. Finally, we sought to test the moderating role of self-compassion on the association between self-coldness and depressive symptoms. Results showed that the SCS negative items and subscales were more strongly related to depressive symptoms than the SCS positive items and subscales. Accordingly, self-coldness was a stronger predictor of depressive symptoms, cross-sectionally and over a 1-year timeframe, when compared with self-compassion. Particularly, the feeling of being isolated was shown to be strongly associated with depressive symptoms. We did not find substantial evidence for a moderating role of self-compassion on the association between self-coldness and depressive symptoms. Future research needs to determine the added value of assessing self-coldness and whether or not it is an essential part of self-compassion.

PMID: 30294388 [PubMed]

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Response to the letter of Liccardi et al.

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Response to the letter of Liccardi et al.

COPD. 2018 Aug 02;:1

Authors: Maters GA, Pool G, Sanderman R, Wempe JB, Fleer J

PMID: 30071174 [PubMed – as supplied by publisher]

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Do single people want to date a cancer survivor? A vignette study.

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Do single people want to date a cancer survivor? A vignette study.

PLoS One. 2018;13(3):e0194277

Authors: Tuinman MA, Lehmann V, Hagedoorn M

Abstract
OBJECTIVE: Qualitative studies indicated that cancer survivors may be worried about finding a partner in the future, but whether this concern is warranted is unknown. We examined single people´s interest in dating a cancer survivor, how they perceive survivors’ traits, and their preferences about the timing of disclosing a cancer history.
METHODS: In three experimental vignette studies, dating website members (n = 324) and college students (n = 138 and n = 131) were randomly assigned to a vignette of a person with or without a history of cancer (experiment 1 & 2), or a cancer survivor beyond or during active follow-up (experiment 3). Respondents rated their interest in dating this fictive person, this person’s traits, and indicated their preferences about the timing of disclosure. ANOVAs with main and interaction effects of condition, gender, and relationship history were conducted, partial eta squared and Cohen’s d were used to estimate the magnitude of effects. Correlations were used to investigate relationships between interest in a date and assessment of traits.
RESULTS: Cancer survivors’ traits were assessed more positively, but interest to date them did not differ from healthy vignettes for both men and women. However, widowed respondents were much less interested in a date with a cancer survivor, and women showed less interest in a cancer survivor during active follow-up relative to survivors beyond follow-up. Most respondents wanted to hear about the cancer diagnosis after a few dates, hardly anyone wanted to hear about this before the first date (2% – 5%).
CONCLUSION AND IMPLICATIONS FOR CANCER SURVIVORS: Cancer survivors do not have to expect any more problems in finding a date than people without a cancer history, and can wait a few dates before disclosing. Survivors dating widowed people and survivors in active follow-up could expect more hesitant reactions and should disclose earlier.

PMID: 29566002 [PubMed – in process]

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Mindfulness, cognitive behavioural and behaviour-based therapy for natural and treatment-induced menopausal symptoms: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

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Mindfulness, cognitive behavioural and behaviour-based therapy for natural and treatment-induced menopausal symptoms: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

BJOG. 2018 Mar 15;:

Authors: van Driel C, Stuursma AS, Schroevers MJ, Mourits M, de Bock GH

Abstract
BACKGROUND: During menopause women experience vasomotor and psychosexual symptoms that cannot entirely be alleviated with hormone replacement therapy (HRT). Besides, HRT is contraindicated after breast cancer.
OBJECTIVES: To review the evidence on the effectiveness of psychological interventions in reducing symptoms associated with menopause in natural or treatment-induced menopausal women.
SEARCH STRATEGY: Medline/Pubmed, PsycINFO, EMBASE and AMED were searched until June 2017.
SELECTION CRITERIA: Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) concerning natural or treatment-induced menopause, investigating mindfulness or (cognitive-)behaviour-based therapy were selected. Main outcomes were frequency of hot flushes, hot flush bother experienced, other menopausal symptoms and sexual functioning.
DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: Study selection and data extraction were performed by two independent researchers. A meta-analysis was performed to calculate the standardised mean difference (SMD).
MAIN RESULTS: Twelve RCTs were included. Short-term (<20 weeks) effects of psychological interventions in comparison to no treatment or control were observed for hot flush bother (SMD -0.63, 95% CI -0.80 to -0.46, P < 0.001, I2  = 0%) and menopausal symptoms (SMD -0.34, 95% CI -0.52 to -0.15, P < 0.001, I2  = 0%). Medium-term (≥20 weeks) effects were observed for hot flush bother (SMD -0.49, 95% CI -0.80 to -0.19, P = 0.002, I2  = 63%). In the subgroup treatment-induced menopause, consisting of exclusively breast cancer populations, as well as in the subgroup natural menopause, hot flush bother was reduced by psychological interventions. Too few studies reported on sexual functioning to perform a meta-analysis.
CONCLUSIONS: Psychological interventions reduced hot flush bother in the short and medium-term and menopausal symptoms in the short-term. These results are especially relevant for breast cancer survivors in whom HRT is contraindicated. There was a lack of studies reporting on the influence on sexual functioning.
TWEETABLE ABSTRACT: Systematic review: psychological interventions reduce bother by hot flushes in the short- and medium-term.

PMID: 29542222 [PubMed – as supplied by publisher]

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Visual complaints of patients with glaucoma and controls under optimal and extreme luminance conditions.

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Visual complaints of patients with glaucoma and controls under optimal and extreme luminance conditions.

Acta Ophthalmol. 2018 Mar 09;:

Authors: Bierings RAJM, van Sonderen FLP, Jansonius NM

Abstract
PURPOSE: To determine (i) whether, compared to controls, visual complaints of glaucoma patients are more pronounced under extreme luminance conditions than in the optimal luminance condition and (ii) whether complaints belonging to different extreme luminance conditions are associated.
METHODS: We developed a luminance-specific questionnaire and sent it to 221 glaucoma patients (response rate 81%); controls (182) were primarily their spouses. Median (interquartile range) mean deviation of the visual field of the patients’ better eye was -4.5 (-10.7 to -1.9) dB. Questions were addressing visual performance under five luminance conditions: presumed optimal (outdoor on a cloudy day), low, high, sudden decrease and sudden increase. We compared percentages of patients and controls who reported visual complaints while performing activities under different luminance conditions.
RESULTS: Percentages of patients and controls with visual complaints were 4 versus 0% (p = 0.02) for optimal luminance and 48 versus 6% (p < 0.001), 22 versus 1% (p < 0.001), 32 versus 1% (p < 0.001) and 25 versus 3% (p < 0.001) for low, high, sudden decrease and sudden increase in luminance. Within the group of glaucoma patients, the frequency of complaints increased significantly with increasing disease severity at a Bonferroni-corrected p value of 0.003 for all but one (p = 0.005) luminance-specific questions that addressed extreme luminance conditions.
CONCLUSION: The concept of (early stage) glaucoma as an asymptomatic disease is only valid with optimal luminance. Differences in visual complaints between glaucoma patients and controls are greater under extreme luminance conditions, especially in the dark. The fact that the cases were aware of their diagnosis could have induced bias.

PMID: 29520960 [PubMed – as supplied by publisher]

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