Great expectations? Pre-transplant quality of life expectations and distress after kidney transplantation: a prospective study.

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Great expectations? Pre-transplant quality of life expectations and distress after kidney transplantation: a prospective study.

Br J Health Psychol. 2014 Nov;19(4):823-38

Authors: Schulz T, Niesing J, Homan van der Heide JJ, Westerhuis R, Ploeg RJ, Ranchor AV

Abstract

OBJECTIVES: Previous research suggests that prior to kidney transplantation, patients overestimate their post-transplant quality of life (QoL). The current study aimed to corroborate these findings, identify determinants of QoL overestimation, examine its association with subsequent distress, and clarify the role of optimism.

DESIGN: Prospective observational study.

METHODS: Physical, psychological, and social QoL expectations, actual QoL, and distress (GHQ-12) of participants (56% male) were prospectively assessed before (T0; n = 228) and 3 (T1; n = 149), 6 (T2; n = 146), and 12 (T3; n = 114) months after successful transplantation.

RESULTS: Patients who were treated with haemodialysis before transplantation reported greater physical QoL overestimation than those who received treatment with peritoneal dialysis. Neither physical nor social QoL overestimation at T1 was prospectively associated with increased distress at T2 or T3. The interaction between optimism and social QoL overestimation at T1 (β = -.56, p < .001) for distress at T2 was significant, with patients low in optimism experiencing more distress after QoL overestimation.

CONCLUSIONS: QoL overestimation is not associated with subsequent distress. Findings suggest that patients low in optimism are more vulnerable to distress following QoL overestimation.

STATEMENT OF CONTRIBUTION: What is already known on this subject? Kidney transplantation improves patients’ quality of life. Prior to kidney transplantation, patients overestimate the scale of this improvement. What does this study add? Quality of life overestimation is not associated with subsequent distress. When optimism is low, kidney transplant recipients experience higher distress following quality of life overestimation.

PMID: 24330416 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

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Keeping up appearances: the role of identity concealment in the workplace among adults with degenerative eye conditions and its relationship with wellbeing and career outcomes.

Keeping up appearances: the role of identity concealment in the workplace among adults with degenerative eye conditions and its relationship with wellbeing and career outcomes.

Disabil Rehabil. 2015 Jun 16;:1-10

Authors: Spiegel T, De Bel V, Steverink N

Abstract

PURPOSE: This study aims to describe the interplay between the work trajectories and the passing patterns of individuals with degenerative eye conditions in different phases of their career, as well as the disease progression and the career and well-being outcomes associated with different works and passing trajectories.

METHODS: Qualitative interviews on the topic of work trajectories were conducted with 36 working or retired individuals with degenerative eye conditions. The “bigger picture” method was used to explore passing and concealment behavioral patterns, and their associations with various work trajectories.

RESULTS: Five patterns of passing and concealment behavior in the workplace were identified and were linked with various work trajectories among visually impaired study participants: (1) no career adjustments, concealed condition throughout career; (2) revealed condition after adjusting career plans; (3) increasingly open about their condition over the course of their career; (4) engaged in career planning, always open about their condition; and (5) engaged in limited career planning, always open about their condition.

CONCLUSIONS: Patterns characterized by less planning and more identity concealment were associated with more stress and lower levels of self-acceptance, while patterns characterized by more planning for vision deterioration and less passing behavior were associated with higher levels self-acceptance and fewer obstacles over the course of an individual’s career. The study’s findings can serve as a guide for health professionals. Implications for Rehabilitation Many individuals with degenerative eye conditions try to conceal their identity as visually impaired in the professional setting. Different aspects of career outcomes (e.g. age of retirement) and wellbeing outcomes (e.g. self-acceptance and stress) associate with identity concealment patterns of individuals throughout their careers. Identifying concealment patterns will allow health professionals to tackle particular adverse outcomes and challenges associated with these patterns.

PMID: 26079635 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

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A randomized controlled trial of an Internet-based cognitive-behavioural intervention for non-specific chronic pain: an effectiveness and cost-effectiveness study.

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A randomized controlled trial of an Internet-based cognitive-behavioural intervention for non-specific chronic pain: an effectiveness and cost-effectiveness study.

Eur J Pain. 2014 Nov;18(10):1440-51

Authors: de Boer MJ, Versteegen GJ, Vermeulen KM, Sanderman R, Struys MM

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Cognitive-behavioural treatment can nowadays be delivered through the Internet. This form of treatment can have various advantages with regard to availability and accessibility. Previous studies showed that Internet-based treatment for chronic pain is effective compared to waiting-list control groups.

METHODS: We conducted a randomized controlled trial comparing an Internet-based cognitive-behavioural intervention with e-mail therapist contact to a face-to-face cognitive-behavioural group intervention. Of the 72 participants who were randomly assigned to an Internet or a group course, 50 participants completed the intervention. Participants were assessed at baseline (T0), immediately after the 7-week course (T1) and at the booster session 2 months later (T2). Pain-related catastrophizing was the primary outcome measure. Pain intensity, fatigue, pain-related interference, locus of control, pain coping, global health-related quality of life and medical expenses were secondary outcome variables.

RESULTS: Significant improvement was found on catastrophizing, pain coping, locus of control and aspects of global health-related quality of life in both the Internet and the group courses directly after the course and at the booster session. Pain intensity was improved in both courses at the booster session. At T2, improvement in catastrophizing, pain intensity, pain coping and some quality of life dimensions was significantly greater in completers of the Internet course than in the group course. Furthermore, the Internet course was cost-effective compared to the group course.

CONCLUSIONS: We conclude that the Internet-based cognitive-behavioural intervention was at least as effective as the face-to-face group intervention and, on some outcome measures appeared to be even more effective.

PMID: 24777973 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

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A web-based cognitive behaviour therapy for chronic fatigue in type 1 diabetes (Dia-Fit): study protocol for a randomised controlled trial.

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A web-based cognitive behaviour therapy for chronic fatigue in type 1 diabetes (Dia-Fit): study protocol for a randomised controlled trial.

Trials. 2015 Jun 6;16(1):262

Authors: Menting J, Nikolaus S, Wiborg JF, Bazelmans E, Goedendorp MM, van Bon AC, van den Bergh JP, Mol MJ, Tack CJ, Knoop H

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Fatigue is frequently reported by patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus. A recent study showed that 40 % of patients experienced severe fatigue that lasted for more than six months and was accompanied by substantial impairments in daily functioning. Currently, there is no effective treatment available for chronic fatigue in patients with type 1 diabetes. Cognitive behaviour therapy aimed at cognitions and behaviours that perpetuate fatigue is effective in reducing fatigue in other chronic diseases. Recent research showed that these cognitions and behaviours are also potential determinants of fatigue in type 1 diabetes. We designed Dia-Fit, a web-based cognitive behaviour therapy for severe and chronic fatigue in patients with type 1 diabetes. This patient-tailored intervention is aimed at reducing fatigue by changing cognitions and behaviours assumed to maintain fatigue. The efficacy of Dia-Fit will be investigated in this study.

METHODS/DESIGN: A randomised controlled trial will be conducted in 120 patients with type 1 diabetes who are chronically and severely fatigued. Patients will be randomised to a treatment or waiting list group. The treatment group will receive Dia-Fit, a blended care therapy consisting of up to eight internet modules and face-to-face sessions with a therapist during a five-month period. The treatment will be tailored to the fatigue-maintaining cognitions and behaviours that are relevant for the patient and are determined at baseline. The waiting list group will receive Dia-Fit after a waiting period of five months. The primary outcome measure is fatigue severity. Secondary outcome measures are functional impairment and glucose control determined by haemoglobin A1c and blood glucose variability.

DISCUSSION: To our knowledge, this is the first study investigating the efficacy of a cognitive behavioural intervention for chronic fatigue in patients with type 1 diabetes.

TRIAL REGISTRATION: Dutch trial register NTR4312 (10 December 2013).

PMID: 26044447 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

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A web-based cognitive behaviour therapy for chronic fatigue in type 1 diabetes (Dia-Fit): study protocol for a randomised controlled trial.

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A web-based cognitive behaviour therapy for chronic fatigue in type 1 diabetes (Dia-Fit): study protocol for a randomised controlled trial.

Trials. 2015 Jun 6;16(1):262

Authors: Menting J, Nikolaus S, Wiborg JF, Bazelmans E, Goedendorp MM, van Bon AC, van den Bergh JP, Mol MJ, Tack CJ, Knoop H

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Fatigue is frequently reported by patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus. A recent study showed that 40 % of patients experienced severe fatigue that lasted for more than six months and was accompanied by substantial impairments in daily functioning. Currently, there is no effective treatment available for chronic fatigue in patients with type 1 diabetes. Cognitive behaviour therapy aimed at cognitions and behaviours that perpetuate fatigue is effective in reducing fatigue in other chronic diseases. Recent research showed that these cognitions and behaviours are also potential determinants of fatigue in type 1 diabetes. We designed Dia-Fit, a web-based cognitive behaviour therapy for severe and chronic fatigue in patients with type 1 diabetes. This patient-tailored intervention is aimed at reducing fatigue by changing cognitions and behaviours assumed to maintain fatigue. The efficacy of Dia-Fit will be investigated in this study.

METHODS/DESIGN: A randomised controlled trial will be conducted in 120 patients with type 1 diabetes who are chronically and severely fatigued. Patients will be randomised to a treatment or waiting list group. The treatment group will receive Dia-Fit, a blended care therapy consisting of up to eight internet modules and face-to-face sessions with a therapist during a five-month period. The treatment will be tailored to the fatigue-maintaining cognitions and behaviours that are relevant for the patient and are determined at baseline. The waiting list group will receive Dia-Fit after a waiting period of five months. The primary outcome measure is fatigue severity. Secondary outcome measures are functional impairment and glucose control determined by haemoglobin A1c and blood glucose variability.

DISCUSSION: To our knowledge, this is the first study investigating the efficacy of a cognitive behavioural intervention for chronic fatigue in patients with type 1 diabetes.

TRIAL REGISTRATION: Dutch trial register NTR4312 (10 December 2013).

PMID: 26044447 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

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Do individuals with and without depression value depression differently? And if so, why?

Do individuals with and without depression value depression differently? And if so, why?

Qual Life Res. 2015 Jun 3;

Authors: Papageorgiou K, Vermeulen KM, Schroevers MJ, Stiggelbout AM, Buskens E, Krabbe PF, van den Heuvel E, Ranchor AV

Abstract

PURPOSE: Health state valuations, used to evaluate the effectiveness of healthcare interventions, can be obtained either by the patients or by the general population. The general population seems to value somatic conditions more negatively than patients, but little is known about valuations of psychological conditions. This study examined whether individuals with and without depression differ in their valuations of depression and whether perceptions regarding depression (empathy, perceived susceptibility, stigma, illness perceptions) and individual characteristics (mastery, self-compassion, dysfunctional attitudes) bias valuations of either individuals with or without depression.

METHODS: In an online study, a general population sample used a time-trade-off task to value 30 vignettes describing depression states (four per participant) and completed questionnaires on perceptions regarding depression and individual characteristics. Participants were assigned to depression groups (with or without depression), based on the PHQ-9. A generalized linear mixed model was used to assess discrepancies in valuations and identify their determinants.

RESULTS: The sample (N = 1268) was representative of the Dutch population on age, gender, education and residence. We found that for mild depression states, individuals with depression (N = 200) valued depression more negatively than individuals without depression (N = 1068) (p = .007). Variables related to perceptions of depression and individual characteristics were not found to affect valuations of either individuals with or individuals without depression.

CONCLUSION: Since the general population values depression less negatively, using their perspective might result in less effectiveness for interventions for mild depression. Perceptions of depression or to individual characteristics did not seem to differentially affect valuations made by either individuals with or without depression.

PMID: 26038219 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

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Opinions of Dutch liver transplant recipients on anonymity of organ donation and direct contact with the donors family.

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Opinions of Dutch liver transplant recipients on anonymity of organ donation and direct contact with the donors family.

Transplantation. 2015 Apr;99(4):879-84

Authors: Annema C, Op den Dries S, van den Berg AP, Ranchor AV, Porte RJ

Abstract

BACKGROUND: In the Netherlands, anonymity of organ donation, which is currently protected by legislation, has come under discussion. In the Dutch society, a tendency to allow direct contact between transplant recipients and their donor’s family is noticeable. As little is known about the opinion of Dutch liver transplant recipients on anonymity of organ donation and direct contact with the donor’s family, this study examines their opinions.

METHODS: A cross-sectional study was conducted in 244 liver transplant recipients. Their opinions were examined in relation to demographic, transplant-related and emotional variables. Data were collected by questionnaire. Transplant-related variables were retrieved from the hospital’s liver transplant database.

RESULTS: Fifty-three percent of the respondents (n = 177) agreed with anonymity of organ donation, mainly out of respect for the donor. Living situation, age, and level of positive affect influenced this opinion. The majority of the respondents (65%) indicated that they would like to receive some information about their donor, like age, sex, and health status. Only 19% of the respondents favored direct contact with the donor’s family, mainly to express their gratitude personally. Respondents transplanted for alcoholic cirrhosis were less in favor of direct contact. Respondents with feelings of guilt doubted more about direct contact.

CONCLUSION: There is no need to change the current legislation on anonymity of organ donation. However, most liver transplant recipients would like to receive some general information about their donor. Therefore, clear guidelines on the sharing of donor data with recipients need to be established.

PMID: 25211521 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

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Pain Associated with Wound Care Treatment among Buruli Ulcer Patients from Ghana and Benin.

Pain Associated with Wound Care Treatment among Buruli Ulcer Patients from Ghana and Benin.

PLoS One. 2015;10(6):e0119926

Authors: Alferink M, de Zeeuw J, Sopoh G, Agossadou C, Abass KM, Phillips RO, Loth S, Jutten E, Barogui YT, Stewart RE, van der Werf TS, Stienstra Y, Ranchor AV

Abstract

Buruli ulcer (BU) is a necrotizing skin disease caused by Mycobacterium ulcerans. People living in remote areas in tropical Sub Saharan Africa are mostly affected. Wound care is an important component of BU management; this often needs to be extended for months after the initial antibiotic treatment. BU is reported in the literature as being painless, however clinical observations revealed that some patients experienced pain during wound care. This was the first study on pain intensity during and after wound care in BU patients and factors associated with pain. In Ghana and Benin, 52 BU patients above 5 years of age and their relatives were included between December 2012 and May 2014. Information on pain intensity during and after wound care was obtained during two consecutive weeks using the Wong-Baker Pain Scale. Median pain intensity during wound care was in the lower range (Mdn = 2, CV = 1), but severe pain (score > 6) was reported in nearly 30% of the patients. Nevertheless, only one patient received pain medication. Pain declined over time to low scores 2 hours after treatment. Factors associated with higher self-reported pain scores were; male gender, fear prior to treatment, pain during the night prior to treatment, and pain caused by cleaning the wound. The general idea that BU is painless is incorrect for the wound care procedure. This procedural pain deserves attention and appropriate intervention.

PMID: 26030764 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

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The Elusory Upward Spiral: A Reanalysis of Kok et al. (2013).

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The Elusory Upward Spiral: A Reanalysis of Kok et al. (2013).

Psychol Sci. 2015 May 29;

Authors: Heathers JA, Brown NJ, Coyne JC, Friedman HL

PMID: 26025022 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

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Factors influencing work functioning after cancer diagnosis: a focus group study with cancer survivors and occupational health professionals.

Factors influencing work functioning after cancer diagnosis: a focus group study with cancer survivors and occupational health professionals.

Support Care Cancer. 2015 May 29;

Authors: Dorland HF, Abma FI, Roelen CA, Smink JG, Ranchor AV, Bültmann U

Abstract

PURPOSE: Cancer survivors (CSs) frequently return to work, but little is known about work functioning after return to work (RTW). We aimed to identify barriers and facilitators of work functioning among CSs.

METHODS: Three focus groups were conducted with CSs (n = 6, n = 8 and n = 8) and one focus group with occupational health professionals (n = 7). Concepts were identified by thematic analysis, using the Cancer and Work model as theoretical framework to structure the results.

RESULTS: Long-lasting symptoms (e.g. fatigue), poor adaptation, high work ethics, negative attitude to work, ambiguous communication, lack of support and changes in the work environment were mentioned as barriers of work functioning. In contrast, staying at work during treatment, open dialogue, high social support, appropriate work accommodations and high work autonomy facilitated work functioning.

CONCLUSIONS: Not only cancer-related symptoms affect work functioning of CSs after RTW but also psychosocial and work-related factors. The barriers and facilitators of work functioning should be further investigated in studies with a longitudinal design to examine work functioning over time.

PMID: 26022706 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

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