Which goal adjustment strategies do cancer patients use? A longitudinal study.

Which goal adjustment strategies do cancer patients use? A longitudinal study.

Psychooncology. 2015 Aug 26;

Authors: Janse M, Fleer J, Smink A, Sprangers MA, Ranchor AV

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: A cancer diagnosis may lead to the need to adjust personal goals. This study longitudinally investigates patients’ use of goal adjustment strategies with goal characteristics over time. Whether and which goal adjustment strategies are used after cancer diagnosis may depend on the period studied (treatment period or follow-up period) and illness variables such as illness severity.

METHODS: Newly diagnosed colorectal cancer patients (n = 186) were asked about their personal goals during three assessments (within 1 month after diagnosis and 6 and 18 months after the first assessment). Eight goal adjustment strategies were assessed over the first 6 months (treatment period) and between 7 and 18 months (follow-up period) using goal characteristics. Illness variables were obtained from patients’ medical records from the national cancer registry.

RESULTS: Most patients used one strategy per period, and patients most often shifted their priorities across life domains. During the treatment period, more patients formed shorter-term goals than during the follow-up period, while during the follow-up period, more patients formed longer-term goals than during the treatment period. Illness variables were not related to the use of goal adjustment strategies.

CONCLUSIONS: The findings show that cancer patients use different goal adjustment strategies and, interestingly, that the use of specific strategies depended on the period after diagnosis but not on illness variables. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

PMID: 26308665 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

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The Therapeutic Alliance Predicts Outcomes of Cognitive Behavior Therapy but Not of Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy for Depressive Symptoms.

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The Therapeutic Alliance Predicts Outcomes of Cognitive Behavior Therapy but Not of Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy for Depressive Symptoms.

Psychother Psychosom. 2015 Aug 6;84(5):314-315

Authors: Snippe E, Fleer J, Tovote KA, Sanderman R, Emmelkamp PM, Schroevers MJ

PMID: 26278928 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

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Business Modeling to Implement an eHealth Portal for Infection Control: A Reflection on Co-Creation With Stakeholders.

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Business Modeling to Implement an eHealth Portal for Infection Control: A Reflection on Co-Creation With Stakeholders.

JMIR Res Protoc. 2015;4(3):e104

Authors: van Limburg M, Wentzel J, Sanderman R, van Gemert-Pijnen L

Abstract

BACKGROUND: It is acknowledged that the success and uptake of eHealth improve with the involvement of users and stakeholders to make technology reflect their needs. Involving stakeholders in implementation research is thus a crucial element in developing eHealth technology. Business modeling is an approach to guide implementation research for eHealth. Stakeholders are involved in business modeling by identifying relevant stakeholders, conducting value co-creation dialogs, and co-creating a business model. Because implementation activities are often underestimated as a crucial step while developing eHealth, comprehensive and applicable approaches geared toward business modeling in eHealth are scarce.

OBJECTIVE: This paper demonstrates the potential of several stakeholder-oriented analysis methods and their practical application was demonstrated using Infectionmanager as an example case. In this paper, we aim to demonstrate how business modeling, with the focus on stakeholder involvement, is used to co-create an eHealth implementation.

METHODS: We divided business modeling in 4 main research steps. As part of stakeholder identification, we performed literature scans, expert recommendations, and snowball sampling (Step 1). For stakeholder analyzes, we performed “basic stakeholder analysis,” stakeholder salience, and ranking/analytic hierarchy process (Step 2). For value co-creation dialogs, we performed a process analysis and stakeholder interviews based on the business model canvas (Step 3). Finally, for business model generation, we combined all findings into the business model canvas (Step 4).

RESULTS: Based on the applied methods, we synthesized a step-by-step guide for business modeling with stakeholder-oriented analysis methods that we consider suitable for implementing eHealth.

CONCLUSIONS: The step-by-step guide for business modeling with stakeholder involvement enables eHealth researchers to apply a systematic and multidisciplinary, co-creative approach for implementing eHealth. Business modeling becomes an active part in the entire development process of eHealth and starts an early focus on implementation, in which stakeholders help to co-create the basis necessary for a satisfying success and uptake of the eHealth technology.

PMID: 26272510 [PubMed]

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Providing care to a child with cancer: a longitudinal study on the course, predictors, and impact of caregiving stress during the first year after diagnosis.

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Providing care to a child with cancer: a longitudinal study on the course, predictors, and impact of caregiving stress during the first year after diagnosis.

Psychooncology. 2015 Mar;24(3):318-24

Authors: Sulkers E, Tissing WJ, Brinksma A, Roodbol PF, Kamps WA, Stewart RE, Sanderman R, Fleer J

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: This study investigated the course, predictors, and impact of caregiving stress on the functioning of primary caregivers of children with cancer during the first year after a child’s cancer diagnosis.

METHODS: Primary caregivers (N = 95, 100% mother, 86% response rate) of consecutive newly diagnosed paediatric cancer patients (0-18 years) completed measures of caregiving stress, depressive symptoms, anxiety, and self-reported health at diagnosis, and 3, 6, and 12 months thereafter.

RESULTS: Results indicated a significant decrease in caregiving stress (especially during the first 3 months after diagnosis). Caregiving stress was predicted by single marital status and the ill child being the mother’s only child. Multilevel analyses, controlled for socio-demographic and medical covariates, showed that, over time, the decline in caregiving stress was accompanied by a reduction in depressive symptoms and anxiety. The amount of variance explained by caregiving stress was 53% for depressive symptoms, 47% for anxiety, and 3% for self-reported health.

CONCLUSIONS: The present study suggests that caregiving stress is an important factor in understanding parental adjustment to childhood cancer. This offers possibilities for developing interventions aimed at preventing caregiving stress, and strengthening mothers’ confidence in their ability to provide good care. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

PMID: 25113320 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

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A Reconsideration of the Self-Compassion Scale’s Total Score: Self-Compassion versus Self-Criticism.

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A Reconsideration of the Self-Compassion Scale’s Total Score: Self-Compassion versus Self-Criticism.

PLoS One. 2015;10(7):e0132940

Authors: López A, Sanderman R, Smink A, Zhang Y, van Sonderen E, Ranchor A, Schroevers MJ

Abstract

The Self-Compassion Scale (SCS) is currently the only self-report instrument to measure self-compassion. The SCS is widely used despite the limited evidence for the scale’s psychometric properties, with validation studies commonly performed in college students. The current study examined the factor structure, reliability, and construct validity of the SCS in a large representative sample from the community. The study was conducted in 1,736 persons, of whom 1,643 were included in the analyses. Besides the SCS, data was collected on positive and negative indicators of psychological functioning, as well as on rumination and neuroticism. Analyses included confirmatory factor analyses (CFA), exploratory factor analyses (EFA), and correlations. CFA showed that the SCS’s proposed six-factor structure could not be replicated. EFA suggested a two-factor solution, formed by the positively and negatively formulated items respectively. Internal consistency was good for the two identified factors. The negative factor (i.e., sum score of the negatively formulated items) correlated moderately to strongly to negative affect, depressive symptoms, perceived stress, as well as to rumination and neuroticism. Compared to this negative factor, the positive factor (i.e., sum score of the positively formulated items) correlated weaker to these indicators, and relatively more strongly to positive affect. Results from this study do not justify the common use of the SCS total score as an overall indicator of self-compassion, and provide support for the idea, as also assumed by others, that it is important to make a distinction between self-compassion and self-criticism.

PMID: 26193654 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

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Long-term effects of individual mindfulness-based cognitive therapy and cognitive behavior therapy for depressive symptoms in patients with diabetes: a randomized trial.

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Long-term effects of individual mindfulness-based cognitive therapy and cognitive behavior therapy for depressive symptoms in patients with diabetes: a randomized trial.

Psychother Psychosom. 2015;84(3):186-7

Authors: Tovote KA, Schroevers MJ, Snippe E, Sanderman R, Links TP, Emmelkamp PM, Fleer J

PMID: 25832365 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

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Telegenetics use in presymptomatic genetic counselling: patient evaluations on satisfaction and quality of care.

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Telegenetics use in presymptomatic genetic counselling: patient evaluations on satisfaction and quality of care.

Eur J Hum Genet. 2015 Jul 15;

Authors: Otten E, Birnie E, Ranchor AV, van Langen IM

Abstract

In recent years, online counselling has been introduced in clinical genetics to increase patients’ access to care and to reduce time and cost for both patients and professionals. Most telegenetics reports so far evaluated online oncogenetic counselling at remote health centres in regions with large travelling distances, generally showing positive patient outcomes. We think online counselling – including the use of supportive tools that are also available during in-person counselling – of presymptomatic patients in their homes can also be feasible and valuable for patients in relatively small regions. We performed a single-centre pilot study of online genetic counselling for 57 patients who were presymptomatic cardiogenetic (n=17), presymptomatic oncogenetic (n=34) and prenatal (3 couples). One-third of presymptomatic patients we approached consented to online counselling. Patient evaluations of practical aspects, satisfaction and psychological outcomes were assessed and compared with a matched control group. Patients managed to fulfil the preparations, were significantly more satisfied with their counsellor and counselling session than controls and were satisfied with the online counselling more than they expected to be beforehand. Psychological outcomes (decreased anxiety and increased control) did not differ with control patients. Technical problems occurred in almost half of online sessions. Nonetheless, online counselling in patients’ homes proved to be feasible and was appreciated by a substantial part of presymptomatic patients at our genetics centre in the Netherlands. Based on these outcomes, we conclude online counselling can be a valuable addition to existing counselling options in regular patient care.European Journal of Human Genetics advance online publication, 15 July 2015; doi:10.1038/ejhg.2015.164.

PMID: 26173963 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

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Fatigue screening in breast cancer patients: identifying likely cases of cancer-related fatigue.

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Fatigue screening in breast cancer patients: identifying likely cases of cancer-related fatigue.

Psychooncology. 2015 Jul 22;

Authors: Goedendorp MM, Jacobsen PB, Andrykowski MA

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: For clinical and research purposes, efficient identification of cases of cancer-related fatigue (CRF) is important, as CRF can be persistent and interfere with usual functioning. While various fatigue-screening instruments are available, no brief screening indices have been developed using formally diagnosed CRF cases as the criterion.

METHODS: Breast cancer patients (n = 385) completed a fatigue diagnostic interview and self-report fatigue measures (Profile of Mood States-fatigue subscale, Fatigue Symptom Inventory, and SF-36 vitality subscale), after initial adjuvant therapy (post-treatment (post-Tx) 1 assessment), after completion of radiotherapy for women receiving chemotherapy + radiotherapy (post-Tx 2 assessment), and 6 months after completion of all adjuvant therapy (6-month post-Tx assessment). CRF cases were identified using specific diagnostic criteria. ROC analyses identified screening indices, which could accurately identify CRF cases after initial adjuvant therapy. Screening indices were cross-validated using post-Tx 2 and 6-month follow-up assessment data.

RESULTS: A total of 104 women (27%) met CRF criteria after initial adjuvant therapy. Six two-item screening indices were identified. For all indices, area under the curve exceeded 0.80, sensitivity exceeded 0.80, and specificity exceeded 0.57. Cross-validation suggested that, except for the index based on SF-36, all the indices continued to accurately identify CRF cases at the post-Tx 2 and 6-month post-Tx assessments. Overall, a two-item composite index based on Fatigue Symptom Inventory ‘most severity’ and ‘work interference’ items performed best.

CONCLUSIONS: Breast cancer patients and survivors meeting CRF diagnostic criteria can be accurately identified using brief screening indices derived from common self-report fatigue measures. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

PMID: 26202003 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

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Identifying the determinants of use of the G&G interventions for older adults in health and social care: protocol of a multilevel approach.

Identifying the determinants of use of the G&G interventions for older adults in health and social care: protocol of a multilevel approach.

BMC Res Notes. 2015;8(1):296

Authors: Kuiper D, Goedendorp MM, Sanderman R, Reijneveld SA, Steverink N

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Despite aging-related losses, many older adults are able to maintain high levels of subjective well-being. However, not all older adults are able to self-manage and adapt. The GRIP&GLEAM [Dutch: GRIP&GLANS] (G&G) interventions have shown to significantly improve self-management ability, well-being and loneliness in older adults. Actual use of the evidence-based G&G interventions, however, remains limited as long as the interplay between implementation factors at different hierarchical stakeholder levels is poorly understood. The aim of the study is to identify the determinants of successful implementation of the G&G interventions.

METHODS/DESIGN: The study is performed in health and social care organizations in the northern part of the Netherlands. The degree of implementation success is operationalized by four parameters: use (yes/no), pace (time to initial use), performance (extent of use) and prolongation (intention to continue use). Based on the Fleuren model, factors at four hierarchical stakeholder levels (i.e. target group, professionals, organizations and financial-political context) are assessed at three measurement points in 2 years. The nested data are analyzed applying multilevel modeling techniques.

DISCUSSION: In this study, health and social care organizations are considered to be part of multilevel functional systems, in which factors at different hierarchical stakeholder levels impede or facilitate use of the G&G interventions. Strengths of the study are the multifaceted measurement of use, and the multilevel approach in identifying the determinants. The study will contribute to the development of ecologically valid implementation strategies of the G&G interventions and comparable evidence-based practices.

PMID: 26148775 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

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Studying learning in the healthcare setting: the potential of quantitative diary methods.

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Studying learning in the healthcare setting: the potential of quantitative diary methods.

Perspect Med Educ. 2015 Jul 17;

Authors: Ciere Y, Jaarsma D, Visser A, Sanderman R, Snippe E, Fleer J

Abstract

Quantitative diary methods are longitudinal approaches that involve the repeated measurement of aspects of peoples’ experience of daily life. In this article, we outline the main characteristics and applications of quantitative diary methods and discuss how their use may further research in the field of medical education. Quantitative diary methods offer several methodological advantages, such as measuring aspects of learning with great detail, accuracy and authenticity. Moreover, they enable researchers to study how and under which conditions learning in the health care setting occurs and in which way learning can be promoted. Hence, quantitative diary methods may contribute to theory development and the optimization of teaching methods in medical education.

PMID: 26183248 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

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